The life of Samuel Johnson. Copious notes by Malone (Google eBook)

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1821
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Page 165 - Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye. And above all these things put on charity, which is the bond of perfectness.
Page 24 - His virtues walked their narrow round, Nor made a pause, nor left a void ; And sure the eternal Master found The single talent well employ'd.
Page 198 - Johnson having argued for some time with a pertinacious gentleman ; his opponent, who had talked in a very puzzling manner, happened to say, " I don't understand you, Sir ; " upon which Johnson observed, " Sir, I have found you an argument ; but I am not obliged to find you an understanding.
Page 314 - He was prone to superstition, but not to credulity. Though his imagination might incline him to a belief of the marvellous and the mysterious, his vigorous reason examined the evidence with jealousy.
Page 292 - Signed, sealed, published and Declared by the said Testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the Presence of us who in his presence and at his request and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as Witnesses thereto.
Page 166 - Bacon upon this subject ; testimony is like an arrow shot from a long bow ; the force of it depends on the strength of the hand that draws it. Argument is like an arrow from a cross-bow, which has equal force though shot by a child.
Page 220 - Veneration for his virtue, reverence for his talents, delight in his conversation, and habitual endurance of a yoke my husband first put upon me, and of which he contentedly bore his share for sixteen or seventeen years, made me go on so long with Mr. Johnson; but the perpetual confinement I will own to have been terrifying in the first years of our friendship, and irksome in the last; nor could I pretend to support it without help, when my coadjutor was no more.
Page 24 - The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by; His frame was firm, his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. " Then, with no throbs of fiery pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 182 - It is the most extraordinary thing that has happened in my day. I heard it with my own ears, from his uncle, Lord Westcote. I am so glad to have every evidence of the spiritual world, that I am willing to believe it.
Page 165 - I THEREFORE, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called...

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