Jane Austen's Emma: A Sourcebook

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Paula Byrne
Psychology Press, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 161 pages
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Emma is widely regarded as Jane Austen's most perfectly constructed novel. At once a comedy of misunderstanding, a razor-sharp analysis of the English class-system, a classic tale of moral growth, and a romance that combines sense with sensibility, it has appealed to readers of every generation and critics of every disposition. This Routledge Literary Sourcebook introduces readers not only to Jane Austen's text, but also to the literary and historical contexts within which the novel was written and to the many different critical readings that it has generated, from the time of its publication to the twenty-first century. Each extract is fully introduced and analyzed, which a concluding section on recommended editions and further reading prepares the reader for further study of this incomparable English novel.
  

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Contents

Contextual Overview
5
Chronology
12
Introduction
31
Early Critical Reception
38
From Walter Scott on Jane Austen journal entry 1826
40
Modern Criticism
48
The Work in Performance
93
Introduction
99
Further Reading
153
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Paula Byrne has a PhD from the University of Liverpool and is the author of a highly-acclaimed study of Jane Austen and the Theatre (Hambledon, 2002). She is now a full-time critic and biographer who lives in Warwickshire and is `siting a life of Austen's near-contemporary, the actress, novelist and poet Mary 'Perdita' Robinson.

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