The works of the English poets. With prefaces, biographical and critical, by S. Johnson (Google eBook)

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Page 60 - Nor think, in Nature's state they blindly trod; The state of Nature was the reign of God: Self-love and social at her birth began, Union the bond of all things, and of man.
Page 140 - His gardens next your admiration call; On every side you look, behold the wall! No pleasing intricacies intervene, No artful wildness to perplex the scene ; Grove nods at grove, each alley has a brother, And half the platform just reflects the other.
Page 52 - The learn'd is happy Nature to explore, The fool is happy that he knows no more; The rich is happy in the plenty given, The poor contents him with the care of Heaven.
Page 41 - With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride, He hangs between, in doubt to act or rest; In doubt to deem himself a God or Beast; In doubt his mind or body to prefer; Born but to die, and...
Page 39 - Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees : Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Page 36 - Mark how it mounts to man's imperial race, From the green myriads in the peopled...
Page 213 - The balanc'd World, and open all the Main ; Your Country, chief, in Arms abroad defend, At home, with Morals, Arts, and Laws amend; How shall the Muse, from such a Monarch, steal $ An hour, and not defraud the Public weal?
Page 50 - Fools ! who from hence into the notion fall, That vice or virtue there is none at all. If white and black blend, soften, and unite A thousand ways, is there no black or white ? Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain ; 'Tis to mistake them, costs the time and pain.
Page 38 - To serve mere engines to the ruling mind ? Just as absurd for any part to claim To be another in this...
Page 64 - Love all the faith, and all th' allegiance then, For nature knew no right divine in men ; No ill could fear in God, and understood A sovereign being but a sovereign good, True faith, true policy, united ran ; That was but love of God, and this of man. Who first taught souls enslav'd, and realms undone, Th...

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