Centennial History of the City of Washington, D. C.: With Full Outline of the Natural Advantages, Accounts of the Indian Tribes, Selection of the Site, Founding of the City ... to the Present Time (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harvey W. Crew
H. W. Crew, 1892 - Washington (D.C.) - 754 pages
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Contents

I
17
II
56
III
64
IV
87
V
108
VI
122
VII
180
VIII
202
XIII
440
XIV
469
XV
519
XVI
534
XVII
589
XVIII
618
XIX
658
XX
696

IX
285
X
351
XI
406
XII
422

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Page 267 - The applause of listening senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their...
Page 506 - Washington, a department of education, for the purpose of collecting such statistics and facts as shall show the condition and progress of education in the several States and Territories, and of diffusing such information respecting the organization and management of schools and school systems, and methods of teaching, as shall aid the people of the United States in the establishment and maintenance of efficient school systems, and otherwise promote the cause of education throughout the country.
Page 610 - I mean stock to remain in this country, to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an Establishment for the Increase and Diffusion of Knowledge among Men.
Page 88 - IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I HAVE CAUSED THESE LETTERS TO BE MADE PATENT, AND THE SEAL OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE TO BE HEREUNTO AFFIXED.
Page 236 - The boundary line between the two republics shall commence in the gulf of Mexico, three leagues from land, opposite the mouth of the Rio Grande, otherwise called Rio Bravo del Norte, or opposite the mouth of its deepest branch, if it should have more than one branch emptying directly into the sea : from thence up the middle of that river...
Page 126 - The discussion took place. I could take no part in it but an exhortatory one, because I was a stranger to the circumstances which should govern it. But it was finally agreed, that whatever importance had been attached to the rejection of this proposition, the preservation of the Union and of concord among the States was more important, and that therefore it would be better that the vote of rejection should be rescinded, to effect which, some members should change their votes.
Page 125 - ... him ; and that the question having been lost by a small majority only, it was probable that an appeal from me to the judgment and discretion of some of my friends, might effect a change in the vote, and the machine of government, now suspended, might be again set into motion.
Page 87 - President of the United States of America, to all who shall see these Presents, Greeting: KNOW YE, That reposing special trust and confidence in the integrity...
Page 126 - So two of the Potomac members (White and Lee, but White with a revulsion of stomach almost convulsive) agreed to change their votes, and Hamilton undertook to carry the other point.
Page 33 - But the distant finishing which nature has given to the picture, is of a very different character. It is a true contrast to the foreground. It is as placid and delightful as that is wild and tremendous.

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