A Practical Guide to Garden Plants: Containing Descriptions of the Hardiest and Most Beautiful Annuals and Biennials, Hardy Herbaceous and Bulbous Perennials, Hardy Water and Bog Plants, Flowering and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Conifers; Hardy Ferns; Hardy Bamboos and Other Ornamental Grasses. Also the Best Kinds of Fruits and Vegetables that May be Grown in the Open Air in the British Isles with Full and Practical Instruction as to Culture and Propagation (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, 1901 - Botany - 1192 pages
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Page 57 - And in short space the laden boughs arise, With happy fruit advancing to the skies : The mother plant admires the leaves unknown Of alien trees, and apples not her own.
Page iii - WEATHERS. Ś A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO GARDEN PLANTS. Containing Descriptions of the Hardiest and most Beautiful Annuals and Biennials, Hardy Herbaceous and Bulbous Perennials, Hardy Water and Bog Plants, Flowering and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Conifers, Hardy Ferns, Hardy Bamboos and other Ornamental Grasses ; and also the best kinds of Fruit and Vegetables that may be grown in the Open Air in the British Islands, with Full and...
Page iii - Flowering and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Conifers, Hardy Ferns, Hardy Bamboos and other Ornamental Grasses ; and also the best kinds of Fruit and Vegetables that may be grown in the Open Air in the British Islands, with Full and Practical Instructions as to Culture and Propagation.
Page iii - Then let the learned gard'ner mark with care The kinds of stocks, and what those kinds will bear; Explore the nature of each sev'ral tree, And, known, improve with artful industry ; And let no spot of idle earth be found ; But cultivate the genius of the ground : For open Ismarus will Bacchus please ; Taburnus loves the shade of olive-trees.
Page 24 - But while it will with certainty become the same species as that in which it originated, it does not possess the power of reproducing any peculiarities which may have existed in its parent. For instance, the seed of a Green Gage plum will grow into a new individual of the plum species, but it will...
Page 17 - Testacemis ; brownish yellow. Tetragonous ; with four angles and four convex faces. Thorn ; an abortive branch with a sharp point ; distinguished from a prickle by being woody. Three-veined ; having three veins, usually of nearly equal size, proceeding from the base. Sometimes leaves are falsely three-veined when the ends of a series of lateral veins combine to form a submarginal vein near each edge of the leaf. Throat ; the orifice of the tube of a gamopetalous corolla or...
Page 16 - Standard ; the upper or posterior petal of a Pea-flower, which is outside the others in the bud. Starlike ; applied to flowers of which the petals are narrow and distant and radiant like a star. Stellate ; radiating from a centre like a star.
Page 101 - April, may bo obtained in this way that I often wonder why amateurs attempt to flower early alpines in any other fashion. ' With me April is the earliest month in which I can expect to have anything gay on the open rockery without disappointment. I am obliged to disfigure the slopes with sheets of glass and handlights to preserve through winter at all Omphalodcs Luciliť, Onosma tauricum, Androsace sarmentosa, and others which cannot endure winter wet, and the real pleasure of the rockery begins...
Page 56 - ... and water, and which is applied to the place of junction so as to form a ball, tapering both upwards and downwards. In France, a composition of 28 parts black pitch, 28 Burgundy pitch, 16 yellow wax, 14 tallow, and 14 sifted ashes, is generally used instead of clay.
Page 101 - ... they may easily die for want of moisture. I will not say more than this, for experience is the best guide, and every one thinks he can manage his frames better than his neighbour ; but of the use of frames for flowering alpines in pots I must add a few words. ' There are certain very early flowering alpines upon which a mixture of admiration and lamentation is bestowed at the end of every winter.

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