Boston Journal of Natural History, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Boston Society of Natural History, 1847 - Natural history
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"Catalogue of the library": v. 1, p. [497]-512; "Additions to the library": v. 3, p. [513]-522; "Constitution and by-laws": v. 6, 13 p.
  

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Page 330 - ... country south, and imagine this whole mass converted by earthquake pulsations of the breadth which such undulations have, into a series of stupendous and rapid-moving waves of translation, helped on by the still more rapid flexures of the floor over which they move, and then advert to the shattering and loosening power of the tremendous jar of the earthquake, we shall have an agent adequate in every way to produce the results we see, to float the northern ice from its moorings, to rip off, assisted...
Page 432 - They are exceedingly ferocious, and always offensive in their habits, never running from man as does the Chimpanzee. They are objects of terror to the natives, and are never encountered by them except on the defensive. The few that have been captured were killed by elephant hunters and native traders as they came suddenly upon them while passing through the forests.
Page 427 - The people of the countrie, when they travaile in the woods, make fires where they sleepe in the night; and in the morning when they are gone, the Pongoes will come and sit about the fire till it goeth out; for they have no understanding to lay the wood together.
Page 330 - ... hundred feet, and an equal subsidence of the country south, and Imagine this whole mass converted by earthquake pulsations of the breadth which such undulations have, into a series of stupendous and rapid-moving waves of translation, helped on by the still more rapid flexures of the floor over which they move, and then advert to the shattering...
Page 431 - The gait is shuffling ; the motion of the body, which is never upright as in man, but bent forward, is somewhat rolling, or from side to side.
Page 431 - ... agree that but one adult male is seen in a band ; when the young male grows up, a contest takes place for mastery, and the strongest, by killing and driving out the others, establishes himself as the head of the community.
Page 476 - MelulonthrK are often caught. The abdomen of the female is flat in the early part of the season, and it is not till August that, being distended with eggs, it assumes the oviform shape. Its cocoon is conical, as large as a small plum, like a pear hanging down. Whenever opened it was found full of young spiders instead of eggs. Is it viviparous? Habitat. The United States.
Page 449 - The organization of the anthropoid Quadrumana justifies the naturalist in placing them at the head of the brute creation, and placing them in a position in which they, of all the animal series, shall be nearest to man. Any anatomist, however, who will take the trouble to compare the skeletons of the Negro and Orang, cannot fail to be struck fit sight with the wide gap which separates them.
Page 502 - ... solid, long, as it were scaly* armed with strong black claws. It is a slow-paced and stupid bird, and which easily becomes a prey to the fowlers. The flesh, especially of the breast, is fat, esculent, and so copious that three or four Dodos will sometimes suffice to fill one hundred seamen's bellies.
Page 5 - Nature of the strata and geographical distribution of the organic remains in the older formations of the United States. Boston Jour. Nat. Hist., vol.

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