Contributions to practical surgery (Google eBook)

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Miller and Holman, printers, 1857 - 29 pages
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My g G Grannpa and what a surgeon!

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Page 4 - ... the first attempt to do so after the accident was followed by violent paroxysms of coughing and choking. His breathing was obstructed and somewhat labored, being unable fully to clear the bronchi of their secretion. This, however, seemed rather an effect of the tense condition of the soft parts of the neck, than the result of pressure upon the spinal cord, since he presented no evidence of paralysis, either of motion or sensation, in parts below the neck. The sternocleido-mastoid muscles of both...
Page 4 - When seated in a chair, the head was thrown back and permanently fixed ; the face turned upward with an anxious expression. The anterior portion of the neck, bulging forwards, was strongly convex, rendering the larynx very prominent. The integuments of this region were exceedingly tense and intolerant of pressure. The posterior portion, of the neck exhibited a sharp, sudden angle at the junction of the fifth and sixth cervical vertebrae, around which the integuments lay in folds. It was difficult...
Page 3 - ... only very unusual, but one which they had never before observed. I was then requested to examine the case, which I did on the ninth day after the accident. With some assistance and great personal effort, he was able to get out of bed, moving very slowly and cautiously. Desiring to expectorate, he was obliged to get down on his hands and knees, which he accomplished with the same deliberation. When seated in a chair, the head was thrown back and permanently fixed ; the face turned upwards with...
Page 8 - ... with great brevity; Mr. Fergusson considers them at greater length, but mixes up dislocations caused by external violence with those consequent upon disease of the spine. With reference to the treatment of traumatic dislocations of the cervical vertebrae, Mr. Miller says : " If life, or the hope of life, remain, replacement is to be effected by careful extension and coaptation.
Page 4 - Ayres, and a number of other medical gentlemen who were present by invitation, all of whom confirmed the diagnosis, and rendered efficient services : The patient was placed upon a strong table in a recumbent position, with a pillow resting under the shoulders, the head being supported by the hand during the administration of chloroform, of which an ounce was given before aiiaes-- thesia ensued.
Page 3 - EK, the subject of this accident, was a laboring man, thirty years of age, tall and muscular, but not fat, with a neck longer than the average among men of equal height. On the evening of the 2d of October he became intoxicated, was brought home insensible, and did not recover from the combined effects of the shock and his libations until the following morning, when he was supposed by his wife to be laboring under cold and a stiff neck. She made some domestic...
Page 4 - He complained of intense and constant pain at this point, which was neither relieved nor aggravated by pressure. With difficulty he swallowed small quantities of liquid, pausing after each effort, and could not be induced to take solid food, since the first attempt to do so after the accident was followed by violent paroxysms of coughing and choking. His breathing was obstructed and somewhat labored, being unable fully to clear the bronchi^ of their secretion.
Page 7 - The reduction of these luxations is very dangerous, and we have often known an individual perish from the compression or elongation of the spinal marrow which always attends these attempts.
Page 8 - Luxations of the spine, without fracture of the processes, is a very rare injury, yet has occurred occasionally in the cervical region, ordinarily between the fifth and sixth vertebrae.
Page 15 - The clavicle was so extensively comminuted that before the wound closed over one third of the bone had escaped, and yet at the end of one year from the time of the accident the shoulder was perfectly symmetrical with its fellow, without drooping or falling forwards. Dr. Ayres thinks that all of the clavicle which was lost has been reproduced.

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