Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb (Google eBook)

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Ginn, 1893 - Greek language - 464 pages
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Contents

OT8 tn without a Verb
283
SECTION IX
286
etc
289
Two forms in Present or Past Wishes 292
292
SKCTlOJf p4OC 740 Greek and Latin expressions of Wish compared Opta tive and Indicative in Wishes distinguished by Time 295
295
CHAPTER V
297
A INFINITIVE WITHOUT THE ARTICLE 745 Infinitive as Subject Predicate or Appositive 299
299
Infinitive as Object 746 Two classes of Object Infinitive
300
Peculiar Object Infinitives in Homer 801
301
Infinitive in Indirect Discourse
302
Infinitive after Verbs of Saying Thinking etc 802
303
Infinitive in Narration like Indicative 304
304
Infinitive after Adjectives Adverbs and Nouns 758 Infinitive with Adjectives denoting Ability Fitness etc 805
305
Infinitive with i6vra rpxHiKorra etc used personally
306
Adjectives with limiting Infinitive 306 807
307
765768 Similar use with Adverbs Verbs and Nouns 307 808
308
EZeu denoting Purpose chiefly Ionic 309
309
Infinitive expressing Result in Homer
310
Is SoKttv us eUaai us IScir anotoai etc
311
Absolute thai as in huv thai
312
Infinitive in Commands Prohibitions Wishes and Exclamations lotions 784 Infinitive in sense of Imperative 31
314
107109
316
Infinitive with toG as Object
317
Infinitive with to after Adjectives and Nouns
318
Constructions of Infinitive as Genitive with tou
319
800803 Infinitive with tov t? and to with Prepositions 320
320
Articular Infinitive as Appositive
321
Future Indicative in Final Clauses
324
CHAPTER VI
329
Genitive Absolute independent of main construction
338
Omission of
346
Participle in Indirect Discourse
359
VERBAL ADJECTIVES IN rios
368
Statistics of the use of the Final Particles
398
Index to the Examples
413
Greek Index
441
Enuli sk Index
452
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

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Page 53 - ... occurrences. The prevailing view is, if we except certain monographs upon the subject, best set forth by Goodwin in his Moods and Tenses, 155, 156, 157, and I accordingly make the presentation there given the basis of my remarks. Goodwin explains this use of the aorist by saying that it gives "a more vivid statement of general truths by employing a distinct case or several distinct cases in the past to represent (as it were) all possible cases, and implying that what has occurred is likely...
Page 145 - TO FACT. 1397. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis has the adverb av. The imperfect here refers to present time or to an act as going on or repeated in past time, the aorist to a simple occurrence in past time, and the (rare) pluperfect to an act completed in past or present time. -Eg...
Page 168 - In general suppositions, the apodosis expresses a customary or repeated action or a general truth, and the protasis refers in a general way to any one of a class of acts.
Page 387 - a ката/Зi/oe i is do not come down, there is great diversity of opinion as to the manner in which these meanings are obtained from the Greek expressions, and still greater as to the origin of the constructions themselves. Most scholars have explained expressions of denial with o...
Page viii - whose writings have thrown light upon most of the dark places in Greek Syntax.
Page 145 - With Supposition contrary to Fact. 222. When the protasis states a present or past supposition, implying that the condition is not or was not fulfilled, the secondary tenses of the indicative are used in both protasis and apodosis. The apodosis takes the adverb av.
Page 382 - There is, in fact, nothing in the earliest employment of these modes to prove that they might not all be specialized uses of forms originally equivalent having, for instance, a general future meaning.
Page 395 - The second person singular of this future with ov /xi/ was used by the dramatists as a prohibition, without abandoning the sense which the future can always have in both positive and negative commands. In these prohibitions the future indicative, in which they had their origin, is generally used ; but the subjunctive occasionally occurs, being analogous to the ordinary aorist subjunctive with...
Page 163 - The future as an emphatic form is especially common, when the condition contains a strong appeal to the feelings or a threat or a warning' GOODWIN, Moods and Tenses, 447.
Page 391 - But for the eight cases of independent fir) that have been quoted, we should never know that the construction existed between Homer and Plato. We have good ground for believing that it remained as a colloquial idiom in the language, though it seldom appeared in literature until Plato revived it and restored it to common use as a half-sarcastic form of expressing mildly a disagreeable truth. In Plato the construction is not confined to this peculiar sense, for we find cases in which honest apprehension...

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