Hegel's Philosophy of Right (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, 2004 - Philosophy
15 Reviews
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel was one of the foremost philosophers of the nineteenth century, best known for his exploration of the realm of human existence, and, in particular, his beliefs in an ultimate reality called the Absolute Spirit. A lifelong scholar, theorist, lecturer and writer, Hegel's reputation as the most important philosopher in Germany eventually led to his prestigious post as Chair of Philosophy at the University of Berlin in 1818, a position he would hold till his death in 1831. In 1820, Hegel published his most sophisticated statements of legal, moral, social and political philosophy in his "Philosophy of Right." The work begins with a discussion of the concept of free will, and progresses into the examination of Hegel's three spheres of 'right': abstract right, morality, and ethical life. Although Hegel's reputation has diminished significantly, his influence can be seen in the works of such important figures as Karl Marx, Jean-Paul Sartre, F. W. Bradley, and John Dewey.
  

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Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Garrett Starr - Goodreads

I have always wanted this collection, but over the years I purchased other books instead. When our church moved into our current digs, this entire collection was hidden away in a back room and covered ... Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Pete Skimin - Goodreads

Picked up this entire set in excellent condition at a library sponsored used book sale for $60.00. hands down one of my best finds. Read full review

Contents

I
21
II
39
III
41
IV
54
V
59
VI
66
VII
69
VIII
71
IX
74
X
88
XI
92
XII
101
XIII
124
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About the author (2004)

Born the son of a government clerk in Stuttgart, Germany, George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel received his education at Tubingen in theology. Arguably the most influential philosopher of the nineteenth century, Hegel's lectures---most notably at the University of Berlin from 1818 to his death---deeply influenced not only philosophers and historians but generations of political activists of both the Right and Left, champions of the all-powerful nation-state on the one hand and Karl Marx on the other. His lectures at Berlin were the platform from which he set forth the system elaborated in his writings. At the heart of Hegel's philosophy is his philosophy of history. In his view, history works in a series of dialectical steps---thesis, antithesis, synthesis. His whole system is founded on the great triad---the Idea as thesis, Nature as antithesis, and the Spirit as synthesis. The Idea is God's will; Nature is the material world, including man; Spirit is man's self-consciousness of the Idea, his coming to an understanding of God's will. The formation over time of this consciousness is History. Spirit does not exist in the abstract for Hegel, but is comprehended in "peoples," cultures, or civilizations, in practice states. Hegelian Freedom is only possible in organized states, where a National Spirit can be realized. This National Spirit, a part of the World Spirit, is realized in History largely through the actions of World Historical Individuals, heroes such as Napoleon, who embody that Spirit. A profound misunderstanding of this doctrine led many German intellectuals to subvert it into a narrow, authoritarian nationalism that glorified the "state" as an end in itself. Although Hegel saw his philosophy as universal, applicable throughout the world, the focus and inspiration of his thought was European. And in his own even smaller world, he was content to support and work for the Prussian state, which he believed to be the highest development of history up to that time.

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