Elementary Number Theory

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 31, 1998 - Mathematics - 301 pages
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Our intention in writing this book is to give an elementary introduction to number theory which does not demand a great deal of mathematical back ground or maturity from the reader, and which can be read and understood with no extra assistance. Our first three chapters are based almost entirely on A-level mathematics, while the next five require little else beyond some el ementary group theory. It is only in the last three chapters, where we treat more advanced topics, including recent developments, that we require greater mathematical background; here we use some basic ideas which students would expect to meet in the first year or so of a typical undergraduate course in math ematics. Throughout the book, we have attempted to explain our arguments as fully and as clearly as possible, with plenty of worked examples and with outline solutions for all the exercises. There are several good reasons for choosing number theory as a subject. It has a long and interesting history, ranging from the earliest recorded times to the present day (see Chapter 11, for instance, on Fermat's Last Theorem), and its problems have attracted many of the greatest mathematicians; consequently the study of number theory is an excellent introduction to the development and achievements of mathematics (and, indeed, some of its failures). In particular, the explicit nature of many of its problems, concerning basic properties of inte gers, makes number theory a particularly suitable subject in which to present modern mathematics in elementary terms.
  

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Good book; covers most of the interesting topics in number theory. Full of good examples and exercises wish solutions in the back.
One notation had me a little puzzled - the use of a decimal point
for multiplication. But this is easy to get used to since all numbers of concern are integers. 5 stars! 

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Textbook

Contents

II
1
III
2
IV
7
V
12
VI
13
VII
16
VIII
19
IX
25
XLV
148
XLVI
152
XLVII
154
XLVIII
157
XLIX
162
L
163
LI
165
LII
166

X
30
XI
32
XII
35
XIII
37
XIV
46
XV
52
XVI
57
XVII
59
XVIII
62
XIX
65
XX
72
XXI
78
XXII
82
XXIII
83
XXIV
85
XXV
92
XXVI
96
XXVII
97
XXVIII
99
XXIX
103
XXX
106
XXXI
108
XXXII
110
XXXIII
113
XXXIV
116
XXXV
117
XXXVI
119
XXXVII
120
XXXVIII
123
XXXIX
130
XL
135
XLI
138
XLII
140
XLIII
143
XLIV
146
LIII
170
LIV
174
LV
176
LVI
179
LVII
182
LVIII
185
LIX
188
LX
191
LXI
196
LXII
201
LXIII
202
LXIV
205
LXV
206
LXVI
214
LXVII
217
LXVIII
218
LXIX
219
LXX
221
LXXI
223
LXXII
226
LXXIII
227
LXXIV
228
LXXV
233
LXXVI
234
LXXVII
237
LXXVIII
239
LXXIX
243
LXXX
247
LXXXI
249
LXXXII
251
LXXXIII
289
LXXXIV
295
LXXXV
297
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About the author (1998)

Gareth A. Jones is Senior Lecturer in Development Geography, and Dennis Rodgers is Lecturer in Urban Development, both at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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