The Mythology of Kingship in Neo-Assyrian Art

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 8, 2010 - Art - 278 pages
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The relief slabs that decorated the palaces of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, which emphasized military conquest and royal prowess, have traditionally been understood as statements of imperial propaganda that glorified the Assyrian king. In this book, Mehmet-Ali Ataç argues that the reliefs hold a deeper meaning that was addressed primarily to an internal audience composed of court scholars and master craftsmen. Ataç focuses on representations of animals, depictions of the king as priest and warrior, and figures of mythological beings that evoke an archaic cosmos. He demonstrates that these images mask a complex philosophical rhetoric developed by court scholars in collaboration with master craftsmen who were responsible for their design and execution. Ataç argues that the layers of meaning embedded in the Neo-Assyrian palace reliefs go deeper than politics, imperial propaganda, and straightforward historical record.
  

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Contents

part i HUMAN AND ANIMAL ONTOLOGY IN THE NEOASSYRIAN PALACE RELIEFS
1
part ii KINGSHIP AND PRIESTHOOD IN THE ART OF ASHURNASIRPAL II
83
part iii THE SEMANTICS OF SAGES AND MISCHWESEN IN NEOASSYRIAN ART AND THOUGHT
145
EPILOGUE
203
NOTES
205
BIBLIOGRAPHY
247
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Mehmet-Ali Ataç is Assistant Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College. A scholar of the art of the ancient Near East, he has contributed to The Art Bulletin and The Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions.

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