Fortune Is a River: Leonardo Da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli's Magnificent Dream to Change the Course of Florentine History

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Plume, May 31, 1999 - Art - 278 pages
3 Reviews
In the tradition of the New York Times bestselling Longitude comes a popular history that reveals the little known story of what happened when two of the world's most brilliant minds met. Italy, the year 1502. Leonardo da Vinci, engineer and possible spy in the court of Cesare Borgia, crosses paths with Niccolo Machiavelli, at that time Florentine ambassador.

The two men formed a friendship, and joined together in an attempt to carry out one of Leonardo's most fantastic dreams: to build a system of canals that would make the Arno river navigable from Florence to the sea. While the primary reason for the project was military, da Vinci and Machiavelli also had commerce in mind. They envisioned a day when explorers would be able to sail from the city center to the sea and back, bringing riches from the New World for the greater glory of Florence.

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Fortune is a river: Leonardo da Vinci and Niccolò Machiavelli's magnificent dream to change the course of Florentine history

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Masters (government, Dartmouth Coll.; Beyond Relativism, LJ 9/15/93) examines Leonardo da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli's cooperative efforts on behalf of the Florentine government in the early 1500s ... Read full review

Review: Fortune is a River: Leonardo da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli's Magnificent Dream to Change the Course of Florentine History

User Review  - Lance Presley - Goodreads

It's actually much more of a minibiography than an accounting of the project. The attempt at moving the river only takes up about half a chapter. Read full review

Contents

A MYSTERIOUS FRIENDSHIP
1
THE ARNO
7
NICCOLO ACHIEVES POWER
49
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Masters is a Professor of Government at Dartmouth College and editor of the "Biology and Social Life" section of Social Science Information. After a B.A. at Harvard (1955), he took his M.A. (1958) and Ph.D. (1961) at the University of Chicago, where he was a student of Leo Strauss and Joseph Cropsey.

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