Anecdotes of the Manners and Customs of London from the Roman Invasion to the Year 1700 ...: To which are Added, Illustrations of the Changes in Our Language, Literary Customs, and Gradual Improvement in Style and Versification, and Various Particulars Concerning Public and Private Libraries ... (Google eBook)

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Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1811 - Costume
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Page 220 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 190 - In my time my poor father was as diligent to teach me to shoot, as to learn me any other thing, and so I think other men did their children : he taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms as divers other nations do, but with strength of the body.
Page 186 - I inquire of it, and hearken for it; but now charity is waxen cold, none helpeth the scholar, nor yet the poor.
Page 194 - He married my sisters with five pound, or twenty nobles apiece, so that he brought them up in godliness and fear of God. He kept hospitality for his poor neighbours, and some alms he gave to the poor.
Page 186 - But London was never so ill as it is now. In times past men were full of pity and compassion, but now there is no pity; for in London their brother shall die in the streets for cold, he shall lie sick at the door between stock and stock, I cannot tell what to call it, and perish there for hunger: was there ever more unmercifulness in Nebo?
Page 243 - Colonel Hutchinson privately discoursing with his cousin about the communications he had had with the king, Ireton's expressions were these: " He gave us words, and we paid him in his own coin, when we found he had no real intention to the people's good, but to prevail by our factions, to regain by art what he had lost in fight.
Page 193 - He had walk for an hundred sheep, and my mother milked thirty kine. He was able and did find the king a harness, with himself and his horse, while he came to the place that he should receive the king's wages. I can remember that I buckled his harness when he went to Blackheath field.
Page 230 - Hearing her so much deplored, he made inquiry after her, and grew so in love with the description that no other discourse could at first please him, nor could he at last endure any other ; he grew desperately melancholy, and would go to a mount where the print of her foot was cut, and lie there pining and kissing of it all the day long, till at length death, in some months' space, concluded his languishment.
Page 352 - April, in the 17th year of the reign of our sovereign lord Charles the Second by the grace of God, of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith.
Page 418 - In every parish is (or was) a church-house, to which belonged spits, crocks, &c., utensils for dressing provision. Here the housekeepers met and were merry, and gave their charity. The young people were there too, and had dancing, bowling, shooting at butts, &c., the ancients sitting gravely by, and looking on. All things were civil, and without scandal.

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