The Balinese

Front Cover
Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1995 - Social Science - 148 pages
5 Reviews
This study of the complex Balinese culture examines Balinese concepts of personhood and society; the integration of art into every aspect of Balinese life; the effects of the Guen Revolution on Balinese agriculture; the ecological role of their water temples in an age-old system of inigrate rice terraces; and the ethnohistory of Bali, including both colonial and Balinese views. The book is organized around four different periods of fieldwork and includes an appendix of available films and videos on the Balinese.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Kassilem - LibraryThing

This was an interesting book. If you ever want to know tons on one culture, these ethnographies are the way to go. There was so much in this book that at times it was almost overwhelming. I did enjoy ... Read full review

Review: The Balinese

User Review  - Amanda - Goodreads

A classic ethnography and a quick read. Great for intro classes Read full review

Contents

FOUR QUESTIONS FOUR JOURNEYS
1
The Geography and Prehistory of Bali
8
BEGINNING FIELDWORK
17
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

J. Stephen Lansing is professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona, external professor at the Santa Fe Institute, and senior research fellow at the Stockholm Resilience Centre. He is the author of "Priests and Programmers" and "The Balinese," and writer and codirector of documentary films such as "Three Worlds of Bali" and "The Goddess and the Computer.

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