Hannah Weiner's Open House

Front Cover
Small PressDistribution, 2007 - Poetry - 178 pages
5 Reviews
Poetry. "HANNAH WEINER'S OPEN HOUSE beckons us into a realm of poetry that bends consciousness in order to open the doors of perception. Weiner is one of the great American linguistic inventors of the last thirty years of the 20th century. She created an alchemical poetry that transforms the materials of everyday life into a dimension beyond sensory perception. The pieces collected here are as much conceptual art as sprung prose, experimental mysticism as social realism, autobiography as egoless alyric. Patrick Durgin has brought together touchstone works, some familiar and some never before published. HANNAH WEINER'S OPEN HOUSE provides the only single volume introduction to the full range of Weiner's vibrant, enthralling, and unique contribution to the poetry of the Americas." Charles Bernstein

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Review: Hannah Weiner's Open House

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

I find Hannah Weiner's writing extremely fascinating--and puzzling. Read full review

Review: Hannah Weiner's Open House

User Review  - Barry - Goodreads

Everything that makes Weiner's writing so fascinating to so many is immediately apparent. A poetry of interruptions. But try as I might, I can't get into most of this work. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
13
Hannah Weiner at Her Job
23
The Lost Eden of Paco Sainz
30
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Hannah Weiner's influence extends from the sixties New York avant-garde, where she was part of an unprecedented confluence of poets, performance and visual artists including Phillip Glass, Andy Warhol, Carolee Schneeman, John Perrault, David Antin, and Bernadette Mayer. Like fellow-traveler Jackson Mac Low, she became an important part of the Language movement of the 70s and 80s, and her influence can be seen today in the so-called "New Narrative" work stemming from the San Francisco Bay Area.

Of Patrick Durgin's poetry, Lyn Hejinian has written, "To read through Durgin's zones is to experience not lyric epiphany but lyric passage, the thrill of thinking's wiggle, slide, and climb.

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