Saving America's Treasures

Front Cover
Dwight Young
National Geographic Society, 2000 - Antiques & Collectibles - 192 pages
1 Review

America's treasures come in all shapes and sizes. Tucked away in every corner of the nation, they literally embody the history of our country and our culture -- but all too often they languish forgotten, the priceless legacy of our past crumbling quietly, inexorably, irreplaceably away. "As a nation," writes First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in her eloquent foreword, "we have allowed too much of our heritage -- the places and objects that comprise the collective memory of America -- to deteriorate. Their preservation is our sacred trust."

At the heart of this important effort is Save America's Treasures, a partnership between the White House Millennium Council and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, nourished by countless ordinary citizens who have pitched in to help identify and reclaim hundreds of landmark artifacts, buildings, and sites. Taken together, they tell the story of America. This fascinating, vividly illustrated book is a wonderfully varied showcase of 47 treasures, carefully selected to display the extraordinary breadth of the project's scope and profiled in a concise text that captures its place in our national chronicle.

Each chapter features an essay by such prominent writers as Thomas Mallon, Francine Prose, and Ian Frazier, who explore the many facets of the American experience: politics and government, invention and industry, quiet congregations at prayer, and exuberant crowds at play. We visit San Esteban del Rey, the mission at the heart of what is thought to be the oldest continuously inhabited community in America, and the African Meeting House in Boston, where black Americans have worshiped for two centuries. In a Texas airfield hangar we ogle a glamour girl painted lovingly onto the sleek nose of a World War II-era bomber; in Florida, we gawk at the opulent Gulf Coast palazzo of circus impresario John Ringling; in New Jersey, we peer into the prolific world of Thomas Edison, whose West Orange laboratory is a living mirror of his fertile mind. Along with these highlighted landmarks, there's also a complete list of the more than 500 preservation projects gathered into Save America's Treasures.

In these pages, we find a remarkable portrait of America: her barns and lighthouses, her factories and fun houses, and above all, her people. Encompassing everything from the private papers of our Founding Fathers to Babe Ruth's personal scrapbooks, from the ancient cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde to Taliesin, home of our quintessentially modern architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, this evocative volume offers a glimpse of a marvelous but endangered legacy -- and a heartfelt call to safeguard our heritage before it vanishes forever.

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Saving America's treasures

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Save America's Treasures is the name given to a nationwide historic preservation project directed by the White House Millennium Council and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Besides ... Read full review

Review: Saving America's Treasures

User Review  - Stephen - Goodreads

2007 wrote: This was an amazing program set up to mark the Millenium by the Clinton Administration. Here historic sites were fast-tracked to protection en mass to preserve America's real treasures and ... Read full review

Contents

Searching for Higher Ground by Phyllis Theroux
97
African Meeting House Boston Massachusetts
104
Ebenezer Baptist Church Atlanta Georgia
107
Copyright

23 other sections not shown

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About the author (2000)

Dwight Young has been actively involved in historic preservation for almost 30 years. He joined the staff of the National Trust in 1977, and moved to Trust headquarters in Washington in 1992. He is the author of "Alternatives to Sprawl," and "Saving America's Treasures." He is best known as author of the "Back Page" feature in "Preservation" magazine. In 2003, the National Trust published a collection of these essays titled "Road Trips through History."
Brian Williams became the anchor of NBC "Nightly News" in 2004, taking over for Tom Brokaw, the first such announced change in the major network news anchors in two decades. He was the "NBC News" Chief White House correspondent, and was the anchor and managing editor of the Saturday edition of "NBC Nightly News" for six years. Williams has been awarded three Emmys, and in over 20 years of broadcasting, he has reported from 23 countries on countless stories of national and international importance.

Karen E. Lange is a journalist and writer with National Geographic Magazine. This is her first children's book. She lives in Tacoma Park, MD.

Ira Block has photographed on assignment for the National Geographic magazine, Traveler magazine, and National Geographic Adventure. He lives in New York City.

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