The age of uncertainty

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Houghton Mifflin, 1977 - Business & Economics - 365 pages
2 Reviews
The distinguished diplomat and economist surveys the ideas and influence of economists and social philosophers, from Adam Smith's day to the present, contrasting the certainties in nineteenth-century economic thought with the uncertainty of today's

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Review: The Age of Uncertainty

User Review  - Federico Carril - Goodreads

Great book Galbraith one of the greatest economist when it comes to explain different issues about economics and history. The book is easy to read and has a great sense of homour. Read full review

Review: The Age of Uncertainty

User Review  - John - Goodreads

Eventhough published in 1977, it still looks like a good read. Read full review

Contents

The Prophets and Promise of Classical Capitalism
11
The Manners and Morals of High Capitalism
43
The Dissent of Karl Marx
77
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (1977)

John Kenneth Galbraith is a Canadian-born American economist who is perhaps the most widely read economist in the world. He taught at Harvard from 1934-1939 and then again from 1949-1975. An adviser to President John F. Kennedy, he served from 1961 to 1963 as U.S. ambassador to India. His style and wit in writing and his frequent media appearances have contributed greatly to his fame as an economist. Galbraith believes that it is not sufficient for government to manage the level of effective demand; government must manage the market itself. Galbraith stated in American Capitalism (1952) that the market is far from competitive, and governments and labor unions must serve as "countervailing power." He believes that ultimately "producer sovereignty" takes the place of consumer sovereignty and the producer - not the consumer - becomes ruler of the marketplace.