Manners and Rules of Good Society: Or, Solecisms to be Avoided (Google eBook)

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Frederick Warne and Company, 1913 - Etiquette - 267 pages
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Page 51 - The Sovereign's nephews. Ambassadors. Archbishop of Canterbury. Lord High Chancellor, Archbishop of York. The Prime Minister. Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Lord President of the Council. Lord Privy Seal. Dukes who may happen to hold either of these five offices 1. Lord Great Chamberlain. 2. Earl Marshal. 3. Lord Steward. 4. Lord Chamberlain. 5. Master of the Horse. Dukes in order of their patents of creation 1. Dukes of England. 2. ,, ,, Scotland. 3. Dukes of Great Britain. 4. ,, Ireland...
Page 51 - Chancellor of the Exchequer. Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Lord Chief Justice of England. Master of the Rolls. President of the Probate Court. The Lords Justices of Appeal. Judges of the High Court Vice-Chancellor of County Palatine of Lancaster. Viscounts' younger Sons. Barons
Page 24 - This is a point ladies should be very punctilious about. doing would be in strict etiquette ; and should she return a " call " by a card only, it should be understood that she wished the acquaintance to be of the slightest ; and should a lady call upon an acquaintance of higher rank than herself, who had only left a card upon her, her doing so would be a breach of etiquette. In large establishments the hall porter enters the names of all callers in a book expressly kept for the purpose, while some...
Page 51 - Knights Grand Commanders of the Star of India. Knights Grand Cross of St. Michael and St. George. Knights Grand Commanders of the Indian Empire. Knights Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order. Knights Grand Cross of Order of the British Empire.
Page 129 - All fees relating to a marriage should be defrayed by the bridegroom, and paid by him, or by the best man on his behalf, in the vestry of the church, previous to the ceremony ; immediately after it, or some days earlier. The Etiquette observed at Weddings is invariably the same whether the wedding takes place in the morning or in the afternoon, or whether it is a grand wedding or a comparatively small one, whether the guests number two hundred or whether they number twenty. The Invitations should...
Page 243 - State Concerts, etc. When the order for general mourning is given on the death of any member of the Royal Family, the order applies to all, although it is optional whether the general public comply with it or not. The Longest Period for a Widow's Mourning Formerly crape was worn for one year and nine months; for the first twelve months the dress was entirely covered with crape. The newer fashion in widows' mourning is to wear crape as a trimming only, and to discontinue its wear after six or eight...
Page 107 - Rtisse, or for dining en famille, are invariably arranged in the same style, the difference being merely the extent of the display made as regards flowers, plate and glass, which are the accessories of the dining-table. When the host helps the soup, a small ladleful for each person is the proper quantity ; a soup-plate should not be filled with soup. When the party is a small one, and the joints or birds are carved by the host, the portions should be handed to the guests in the order in which they...
Page 74 - Courts are the wives and daughters of the members of the aristocracy, the wives and daughters of those holding high official appointments in the Government, the wives and daughters of Members of Parliament, the county gentry and town gentry, the wives and daughters of the members of the legal, military, naval, clerical, medical, and other professions, the wives and daughters of merchants, bankers, and members of the Stock Exchange, and persons engaged in commerce on a large scale. Although the word...
Page 25 - If the hostess were not at home, cards should be left. her the day following, she can, if she desires, leave cards on her the following season, or, if residing in the same town, within a reasonable time of the entertainment ; but if these cards are not acknowledged by cards being left in return, she should of course understand that the acquaintance is to proceed no further. A lady should not leave cards on another lady to whom she has but recently been introduced at a dinner-party or afternoon tea...
Page 6 - ... but social obligations due from one person to another. Why should we not be a well-mannered people ? Why should we not be refined, cultivated, and polished in our demeanour and bearing ? Why should we not seek to charm if we can? Why should we not cultivate and encourage in ourselves consideration, thoughtfulness, and graciousness towards others in the smallest details of daily life? CHAPTER II INTRODUCTIONS THERE are ceremonious introductions and unceremonious introductions, premeditated introductions...

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