Elements of Machine Design (Google eBook)

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McGraw-Hill Book Company, Incorporated, 1917 - Machine design - 607 pages
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Contents

Specifications of Pig Iron
28
CHAPTER III
48
Efficiency of Boiler Joints
57
Ultimate Shearing Stresses in Rivets
58
Recommended Sizes of Rivet Holes
59
Tension Members
71
CHAPTER IV
76
United States Standard Bolts and Nuts
78
Proportions of Sellers Square Threads
79
Proportions of Acme Standard Threads
80
Coupling Bolts
81
S A E Standard Bolts and Nuts
82
Standard Cap Screws
84
Standard Machine Screws
86
Safe Holding Capacities of Set Screws
87
Plain Lock Washers
94
Coefficients of Friction for Square Threaded Screws
107
Bearing Pressures on Power Screws
108
Dimensions of Woodruff Keys
112
Diameters of Shafts and Suitable Woodruff Keys
113
Round Keys and Taper Pins
115
Dimensions of Gibhead Keys
119
127
127
B S Drop Forged Rod and Yoke Ends
128
CHAPTER VI
129
Values of Coefficients K K K2 and K
133
Values of Coefficients K K5 K and K7
134
Values of Coefficients K8 and Ke
136
CHAPTER VII
147
Results of Test on Leather Belting
149
Strength of Leather Belt Joints
155
Average Ultimate Strength of Leather Belting
160
Comparative Transmitting Capacities of Pulleys
166
Proportions of Extraheavy Castiron Pulleys
167
CHAPTER VIII
175
Manila Rope
176
Hoisting Tackle Reefed with Manila Rope
179
Dimensions of Grooves for Manila Rope Sheaves
184
CHAPTER IX
195
Tensions due to Slack as Shown by Dynamometer
200
Steel Wire Rope
203
Hoisting Tackle Reefed with Wire Rope
205
General Dimensions of Wire Rope Sheaves
206
Dimensions of Grooves for Wire Rope Drums
207
Coefficients of Friction for Wire Rope
214
Chains and Sprockets
216
Hoisting Chains
217
Dimensions of Grooves for Chain Drums
218
Dimensions of Plain Chain Sheaves
221
Ewart Detachable Chain
229
Closedjoint Conveyor and Power Chains
232
Union Steel Chains
233
Sprocket Teeth Factors
236
CHAPTER XII
280
Radii for 15 Involute Teeth
286
Brown and Sharpe Standard Involute Cutters
287
Radii for Cycloidal Teeth
290
Brown and Sharpe Standard Cycloidal Cutters
292
Lewis Factors for Gearing
297
Lewis Factors for Stub Teeth
298
Proportions of Cut Teeth
299
Values of So for Various Materials
302
Data Pertaining to Rawhide Gears
304
CHAPTER XIV
306
Dimensions of Gear Hubs
310
Strength of Gear Teeth used by C W Hunt
312
Dimensions of the Fellows Stub Teeth
313
Constants for Gleason Unequal Addendum Teeth
314
CHAPTER XIII
322
Experimental Data Pertaining to Bevel Gears
349
Screw Gearing
350
Proportions of Helical Teeth
354
Values of Coefficient K as recommended by W C Bates
356
Cramps Gear Bronzes
367
Standard 29 Worm Threads
368
Results of Tests on Castiron Worm Gearing
381
CHAPTER XV
383
Proportions of Westinghouse Flange Couplings
387
Dimensions of Clamp Couplings
388
Dimensions of Bocorselski00s Universal Joints
391
Dimensions of Merchant Evans Universal Joints
392
Data Pertaining to Leather Link Couplings
394
Data Pertaining to Leather Laced Couplings
396
Data Pertaining to Francke Couplings
398
CHAPTER XVI
405
Proportions of Slip Couplings
431
Data Pertaining to Various Types of Disc Clutches
437
CHAPTER XVIII
489
Fiber Stresses at the Elastic Limit
499
CHAPTER XIX
513
Allowable Bearing Pressures
528
Relation between Length and Diameter of Bearings
529
Dimensions of Rigid Post Bearings
541
Coefficients of Friction for Collar Thrust Bearings
552
CHAPTER XX
556
Allowable Bearing Pressures and Coefficients of Friction
561
Data Pertaining to Norma Roller Bearings
563
Data Pertaining to Hyatt High Duty Bearings
564
Crushing Strength of Tool Steel Balls
575
Data Pertaining to HessBright Radial Ball Bearings
577
Data Pertaining to S K F Radial Ball Bearings
579
Data Pertaining to F S Thrust Ball Bearings
581
Data Pertaining to Gurney Radiothrust Ball Bearings
585
Roller Bearing DataMounting of Roller BearingsForms
589
Copyright

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Page 28 - The purchaser reserves the right to reject any portion or all of the material which does not conform to the above specifications in every particular and to return the rejected material to the manufacturer or seller for full credit at price charged FOB point of delivery specified by the purchaser. If the material is to be replaced, a new order will be entered at prices, terms, and conditions acceptable to the purchaser.
Page 11 - M = , (12) c in which / represents the moment of inertia of the beams crosssection, and c the distance from the center of gravity of the section to the outermost fiber.
Page 371 - E., 71 feet; With a line at right angles to the center line of the highway N. 76 53...
Page 54 - Vz inch nor more than % inch. Rivets connecting the shell to the gunwale shall be spaced not more than 3 inches on centers. The size of the rivets for connecting the shell plating to the keel, stem, and sternpost and gunwale shall be not less than that...
Page 166 - Tests of the Transmitting Capacities of Different Pulleys in Leather Belt Drives," in which he presented the results of an extended investigation on the transTABLE 39.
Page 280 - GH, is called the circular pitch, or circumferential pitch, and is equal to the circumference of the pitch circle divided by the number of teeth. In order to run together, two gears must have the same circular pitch.
Page 288 - ... dropped altogether. But it was first in the field, is simple in theory, is easily drawn, has the recommendation of many well-meaning teachers, and holds its position by means of "human inertia...
Page 94 - The washer when not held FIG. 629. down by the nut has the form shown in the lower part of the figure ; when the nut is screwed down tightly, the washer is flattened out and its elasticity keeps the nut tight on the bolt. FORMS OF BOLTS AND SCREWS. 1951. Bolts. A stud bolt, or stud, is shown in Fig. 630. Each end of the stud has a screw thread cut on it. One end screws into one of the pieces to be connected, the other carries a nut. A stud having a collar is shown in Fig.
Page 476 - To safely hoist, hold, and lower a load, hoisting machinery is usually equipped with so-called safety, automatic, or retaining brakes. These brakes permit a load to be lifted freely by the motor, and lock the brake by the gravity action of the load as soon as the lifting torque of the motor ceases to act in the hoisting direction. The load is retained by the brake in any position, and only when the motor runs in the lowering direction is the acting power of the brake diminished, allowing the load...
Page 90 - The pitch allowed for stay-bolts on a flat surface and on the furnace sheet of an internally fired boiler in which the external diameter of the furnace is over thirty-eight (38) inches, except a corrugated furnace or a furnace strengthened by an Adamson ring or equivalent...

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