The Last Emperors: A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Oct 16, 1998 - History - 481 pages
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The Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) was the last and arguably the greatest of the conquest dynasties to rule China. Its rulers, Manchus from the north, held power for three centuries despite major cultural and ideological differences with the Han majority. In this book, Evelyn Rawski offers a bold new interpretation of the remarkable success of this dynasty, arguing that it derived not from the assimilation of the dominant Chinese culture, as has previously been believed, but rather from an artful synthesis of Manchu leadership styles with Han Chinese policies.
  

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Contents

IV
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V
17
VI
59
VII
92
VIII
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IX
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X
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XI
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XIX
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XX
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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Page 2 - These alien races do not number altogether more than ten million, so that, for the most part, the Chinese people are of the Han or Chinese race with common blood, common language, common religion, and common customs — a single, pure race. What is the standing of our nation in the world ? In comparison with other nations we have the greatest population and the oldest culture, of four thousand years

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About the author (1998)

Evelyn S. Rawski is University Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh, coauthor of "Chinese Society in the Eighteenth Century "(1987), and coeditor of "Harmony and Counterpoint: Ritual Music in Chinese Context "(1996), "Death Ritual in Late Imperial and Modern China "(California, 1988), and "Popular Culture in Late Imperial China "(California, 1985).

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