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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Notes are often necessary, but they are necessary evils. Let him that is yet unacquainted....  
" Notes are often necessary, but they are necessary evils. Let him that is yet unacquainted with the powers of Shakespeare, and who desires to feel the highest pleasure that the drama can give, read every play from the first scene to the last, with utter... "
The works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: With An essay on his life and genius - Page 195
by Samuel Johnson - 1810
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Mr. Johnson's Preface to His Edition of Shakespear's Plays

Samuel Johnson - 1765 - 72 pages
...feel the .higheft pleafure that the drama can give, read every play from the firft fcene to the laft, with utter negligence of all his commentators. When his fancy is once on the wing, let it not (loop at correction or explanation. When his attention is ftrongly engaged, let it difdain alike to...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Prefaces. Tempest. Two gentlemen of Verona ...

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - Drama - 1773
...feel the higbeft pleafure that the drama can give, read every play, from the firft fcene to the laft, with utter negligence of all his commentators. When his fancy is once on the Ving, let it not {loop at correction or explanation. When his attention is ftrongly engaged, let it...
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Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson, Thomas Davies - 1774
...feel the higheft Pleafure that the Drama can give, read every Play, from the firft Scene to the laft, with utter Negligence of all his Commentators. When his Fancy is once on the Wing, let it not ftoop at Correction or Explanation. When his Attention is ftrongly engaged, let it difdain alike to...
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Miscellaneous and fugitive pieces [chiefly of Johnson, ed. by T. Davies].

Samuel Johnson - 1774
...feel the higheft Pleafurethat the Drama cangive, read every Play, from the firft Scene to the laft, with utter Negligence of all his Commentators. When his Fancy is once on the Wing, let it not ftoop at Correction or Explanation. When his Attention is ftrongly engaged, let it difdain alike to...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: The Adventurer. Philological tracts

Samuel Johnson, Sir John Hawkins - English literature - 1787
...pleafure that the drama can give, read every play> from the firft fcene to the laft, with utter negligence negligence of all his commentators. When his fancy is once on the wing, let it not ftoop at correclion or explanation. When his attention is ftrongly engaged, let it difdain alike to...
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Dramatic Writings of Will. Shakespeare

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, John Bell, George Steevens - 1788
...necessary, but they are necessary fcvils. Let him, that is yet unacquainted with the powers of Shakspere, and who desires to feel the highest pleasure that...explanation. When his attention is strongly engaged, let it disdain alike to turn aside to the name of Theobald and of Pope. Let him read on through brightness...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: In Fifteen Volumes. With the ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1793
...feel the higheft pleafure that the drama can give, read every play, from the firft fcene to the laft, with utter negligence of all his commentators. When his fancy is once on the wing, let it not ftoop at correction or explanation. When his attention is ftrongly engaged, let it difdain alike to...
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Boswell's Life of Johnson: Including Boswell's Journal of a Tour ..., Volume 1

James Boswell, Samuel Johnson - Hebrides (Scotland) - 1799
...Boswell's delightful pages I would venture to give the advice Johnson gives about Shakespeare: ' Let him that is yet unacquainted with the powers of Shakespeare,...explanation. When his attention is strongly engaged let it disdain alike to turn aside to the name of Theobald and of Pope. Let him read on through brightness...
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Life of Johnson: Including Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides and ...

James Boswell, Samuel Johnson - 1799
...Boswell's delightful pages I would venture to give the advice Johnson gives about Shakespeare: ' Let him that is yet unacquainted with the powers of Shakespeare,...explanation. When his attention is strongly engaged let it disdain alike to turn aside to the name of Theobald and of Pope. Let him read on through brightness...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare...

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1800
...feel the higheft pleafure that the drama can give, read every play, from the firft fcene to the laft, with utter negligence of all his commentators. When his fancy is once on the wing, let it not ftoop at torreition or explanation, When his attention i 9 ftrongly ftrongly engaged, let it difdain...
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