A treatise on deformities (Google eBook)

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Page 232 - ... arm-pits, and about the flanks and thighs. And then to draw and extend as much as we can, upwards and downwards, yet without violence: for unless such extension be made, restitution is not to be hoped for, by reason of the processes and hollowed cavities of the vertebra, whereby, for the faster knitting, they mutually receive each other.
Page 179 - Shaw, that in whatever state of distortion the spine and ribs may be, the bones of the pelvis will not be found distorted, unless there be at the same time marks of rickets in some of the long and solid bones...
Page 173 - It is, perhaps, correct to say, that the less exercise a child takes, the more does it require general muscular relaxation in the recumbent position, and that the lighter and more sedentary the pursuits are, the more necessity will there be, either for active exercise or general relaxation. Thus in warm climates, where active exercises cannot be taken, the due relation of parts, or balance of the system, is preserved by great indulgence in the recumbent position.
Page 11 - ... foot is planted, and the body is carried forward perpendicularly over the foot, the joint of the leg and foot becomes fixed, and we have a steady base to rest upon. We next observe, that, in walking, the heel first touches the ground. If the bones of the leg were perpendicular over the part which first touches the ground, we should come down with a sudden jolt, instead of which we descend in a semicircle, the centre of which is the point of the heel. And when the toes have come to the ground...
Page 8 - Hence it enters into the composition of parts whose functions require the combination of firmness with pliancy and flexibility, the preservation of a certain external form, with the power of yielding to external force or pressure.
Page 214 - I have just said, rendered unfit for all the purposes of locomotion, and do also lose much of their natural sensibility, but notwithstanding this, they have neither the flabby feel, which a truly paralytic limb has, nor have they that seeming looseness at the joints, nor that total incapacity of resistance, which allows the latter to be twisted in almost all directions: on the contrary, the joints have frequently a considerable degree of stiffness, particularly the ankles, by which stiffness the...
Page 105 - ... soon as the equilibrium between the muscles of the tibia and fibula is restored, to promote, by means of the combined action of these two classes of muscles, the direct flexion of the foot upon the tibia, so that as soon as the resistance of the tendo Achillis and the muscles of the calf of the leg is overcome, the posterior tuberosity of the os calcis may be depressed and brought into a proper direction with the sole of the foot, and that the foot may thus regain its aptitude for performing...
Page 38 - ... all ages. With regard to the period of life, to which a possibility of curing deformity extends, there will of course be great difference according to the cases. The earlier the stage, in which curative means are applied, the better ; but it may be established as a general rule, that, during the period of growth, most distortions, that are at all curable, may be entirely removed. So long is it before any marked effect is produced on the form of the bones, in many varieties of club-feet, that...
Page 104 - ... metatarsal bones are not altered in their relation to one another. The indications of cure of this deformity, as insisted on by Scarpa, are as follows : I. To cause an insensible and gradual turning of the os naviculare, cuboides, and os calcis, and, with these, of the cuneiform and metatarsal bones, in a contrary direction to that which the deformity has produced, and, consequently, to bring back the forepart of the foot into its proper and natural direction with the tibia. II. To substitute...
Page 37 - ... fact; but the instances of a natural cure are so few, that all such hope ought to be abandoned, and proper means of cure resorted to, at as early a period as possible. Children with distorted limbs, are sent from their homes to the sea, in the hope, that by increasing the vigour of their constitution, the deformity may be removed ; but disappointment too generally follows, and the malady, augmented during the time so devoted, must sooner or later be met by the only certain methods of cureómechanical...

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