Stories and Early Novels

Front Cover
Library of America, 1995 - Fiction - 1199 pages
34 Reviews
The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfect gift for everyone.

In Chandler's hands, the pulp crime story became a haunting mystery of power and corruption, set against a modern cityscape that is both lyrical and violent.

"As another reminder of where we've come from and why we're still reading mysteries, The Library of America has put together two handsome volumes of Raymond Chandler's work -- guaranteed to bring a broad grin of acquisitive delight to the face of any recipient". -- Los Angeles Times Book Review

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
22
4 stars
8
3 stars
3
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: Chandler: Stories and Early Novels

User Review  - Karl - Goodreads

Really liked The High Window. I would rank it below The Lady in the Lake, but above The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely. Now I'm going to read some of the pulp stories that I had skipped over. Read full review

Review: Chandler: Stories and Early Novels

User Review  - Rich - Goodreads

"The room he went into was paved with dirty brown linoleum, furnished with the peculiar sordid hideousness only municipalities can achieve." Blackmailers Don't Shoot, p. 48. Read full review

Contents

Pulp Stories
5
Chronology
1181
Note on the Texts
1191
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

Raymond Thornton Chandler (1888 - 1959) was the master practitioner of American hard-boiled crime fiction. Although he was born in Chicago, Chandler spent most of his boyhood and youth in England where he attended Dulwich College and later worked as a freelance journalist for "The Westminster Gazette" and "The Spectator," During World War I, Chandler served in France with the First Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, transferring later to the Royal Flying Corps (R. A. F.). In 1919 he returned to the United States, settling in California, where he eventually became director of a number of independent oil companies. The Depression put an end to his career, and in 1933, at the age of forty-five, he turned to writing fiction, publishing his first stories in "Black Mask," Chandler's detective stories often starred the brash but honorable Philip Marlowe (introduced in 1939 in his first novel, The Big Sleep) and were noted for their literate presentation and dead-on critical eye. Never a prolific writer, Chandler published only one collection of stories and seven novels in his lifetime. Some of Chandler's novels, like The Big Sleep, were made into classic movies which helped define the film noir style. In the last year of his life he was elected president of the Mystery Writers of America. He died in La Jolla, California on March 26, 1959.

Bibliographic information