The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory

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Princeton University Press, 1991 - Science - 344 pages
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This classic work in the philosophy of physical science is an incisive and readable account of the scientific method. Pierre Duhem was one of the great figures in French science, a devoted teacher, and a distinguished scholar of the history and philosophy of science. This book represents his most mature thought on a wide range of topics.


  

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Contents

VI
7
VII
9
VIII
10
IX
14
X
16
XI
19
XII
21
XIII
23
XLV
153
XLVI
158
XLVII
163
XLVIII
165
XLIX
168
L
172
LI
174
LII
178

XIV
24
XV
27
XVI
31
XVII
39
XVIII
55
XIX
57
XX
60
XXI
63
XXII
69
XXIII
76
XXIV
80
XXV
86
XXVI
93
XXVII
99
XXVIII
105
XXIX
107
XXXI
108
XXXII
110
XXXIII
112
XXXIV
115
XXXV
121
XXXVI
124
XXXVII
128
XXXVIII
132
XXXIX
135
XL
138
XLI
141
XLII
144
XLIV
147
LIII
180
LIV
183
LV
188
LVI
190
LVII
195
LVIII
200
LIX
205
LX
208
LXI
212
LXII
216
LXIII
219
LXV
220
LXVI
252
LXVII
257
LXVIII
259
LXIX
268
LXX
271
LXXI
273
LXXII
275
LXXIII
279
LXXIV
282
LXXV
287
LXXVI
291
LXXVII
293
LXXVIII
299
LXXIX
305
LXXX
312
LXXXI
337
Copyright

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Page xix - A physical theory is not an explanation. It is a system of mathematical propositions, deduced from a small number of principles, which aim to represent as simply, as completely, and as exactly as possible a set of experimental laws.

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About the author (1991)

Pierre Duhem (1861-1916) is best known in science for his work in thermodynamics and in history of science for his treatment of the Middle Ages. He was Professor of Physics at the University of Bordeaux

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