International Human Rights

Front Cover
Westview Press, 1998 - Political Science - 216 pages
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Human rights, now a regular part of international relations, were not recognized as a legitimate subject of diplomatic concern prior to 1945. Jack Donnelly traces the rise of human rights issues after World War II, through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the dark days of the Cold War, the resurgence of interest during the Carter presidency, and the Reagan administration’s resistance, up to the current post–Cold War era.Although concerned primarily with the international politics of human rights, the book includes a chapter on theoretical issues, including the moral basis of human rights, problems of cultural relativism, and the place of human rights in the contemporary international society of states. Case studies of human rights violations in Chile, Argentina, South Africa, El Salvador, and Nicaragua, as well as extensive illustrations drawn from other parts of the world, lend concreteness to the discussion. Throughout the volume, Donnelly gives attention not only to the realist emphasis on power and international anarchy but also to the reality and impact of moral concerns, interdependence, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations.Tables, boxes, photos, cartoons, and essential human rights documents accompany the text, along with features common to all Dilemmas in World Politics books—discussion questions, suggested readings, a chronology, and a glossary. International Human Rights is ideal for all levels of students in international relations, foreign policy, peace studies, international organizations, and law.
  

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Contents

The United States and the Southern Cone
103
US Policy Toward South Africa
105
Other Western Approaches to International Human Rights
109
Explaining Differences in International Human Rights Policies
112
Responding to Tiananmen
117
International Responses to Tiananmen
122
Assessing the Impact of International Action
128
Constructive Engagement Revisited
130

The Source or Justification of Human Rights
22
Lists of Human Rights
24
Human Rights and the Society of States
28
Realism and Human Rights
32
Cultural Relativism and Universal Human Rights
34
The Domestic Politics of Human Rights The Case of the Southern Cone
38
Torture and Disappearances
40
The National Security Doctrine
42
Human Rights NGOs
45
The Collapse of Military Rule
47
Settling Accounts with Torturers and the Past
48
The Multilateral Politics of Human Rights
53
TreatyReporting Systems
59
Workers Rights and Apartheid
64
Regional Human Rights Mechanisms
70
Assessing Multilateral Human Rights Mechanisms
84
Human Rights and Foreign Policy
88
Central America and US Human Rights Policy
93
Asian Values
133
War and Genocide in the Former Yugoslavia
138
War and Genocide
140
The International Response
141
New Patterns and Precedents
146
Nationalism and Human Rights
148
International Human Rights in a PostCold War World
151
Sovereignty Power and Interdependence
153
Democracy and Human Rights
155
Markets and Human Rights
161
International Human Rights Policy in a New World Order
163
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
167
Discussion Questions
171
Notes
183
Suggested Readings
193
Glossary
203
Index
207
Copyright

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Page 166 - Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.
Page 166 - Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation...
Page 165 - Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world, Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind...
Page 166 - Article 1 All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. Article 2 Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.
Page 166 - Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks. ARTICLE 13 1. Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state. 2. Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.
Page 9 - Rights particular situations which appear to reveal a consistent pattern of gross and reliably attested violations of human rights requiring consideration by the Commission; 6.

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About the author (1998)

Jack Donnelly is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of International Relations at the Graduate School of International Studies at the University of Denver. He has written numerous articles on human rights theory and practice that have appeared in journals such as American Political Science Review, World Politics, and Human Rights Quarterly. He is also the author of Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice.

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