Pioneers of Marion County: Consisting of a General History of the County from Its Early Settlement to the Present Date. Also, the Geography and History of Each Township, Including Brief Biographical Sketches of Some of the More Prominent Early Settlers in Each, Together with Numerous Incidents Illustrative of Pioneer Life More Than Twenty-five Years Ago (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Republican steam printing house, 1872 - Marion County (Iowa) - 346 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 70 - Anderson, before the delivery of the books, records, papers, and copies, herein specified, to require of the surveyor appointed under the provisions of this act, bond with good and sufficient security, to be approved of by the county court of the county of Jefferson, in the state of Kentucky, if not approved of by the personal representatives of said Richard C. Anderson, in the penal sum of...
Page 26 - So the prospect for a house, which was also to be home, was one that gave courage to the rough toil, and added a zest to the heavy labors. The style of the home entered very little into their thoughts it was shelter they wanted, and protection from stress of weather and wearing exposures.
Page 27 - For a fire-place, a wall of stone and earth frequently the latter only, when stone was not convenient was made in the best practicable shape for the purpose, in an opening in one end of the building, extending outward, and planked on the outside by bolts of wood notched together to stay it. Frequently a fire-place of this kind was made so capacious as to occupy nearly the whole width of the house. In cold weather, when a great deal of...
Page 38 - Among other things calculated to annoy and distress the pioneer was the prevalence of wild beasts of prey, the most numerous and troublesome of which was the wolf. While it was true, in a figurative sense, that it required the utmost care and exertion to "keep the wolf from the door," it was almost as true in a literal sense. There were two species of these animals, the large, black, timber wolf, and the smaller gray wolf that usually inhabited the prairie. At first, it was next to impossible for...
Page 71 - And if such negro or mulatto shall still fail to give the bond and security required by the first section of this act, * * * it shall be the duty of the county commissioners of such county to hire out such negro or mulatto for six months, for the best price in cash that can be had. The proceeds of such hiring shall be paid into the county treasury of the proper county, for the use of such negro or mulatto, in such manner as shall be directed by the board of county commissioners aforesaid.
Page 38 - floorings" or layers were threshed, the straw was carefully raked off and the wheat shoveled Into a heap to be cleaned. This cleaning was sometimes done by waving a sheet up and down to fan out the chaff as the grain was dropped before it...
Page 30 - ... peeled off, after which it was well washed, to cleanse it of the lye. It was then boiled again to soften it, when it was ready for use, as occasion required, by frying and seasoning it to the taste. Another mode of preparing hominy was by pestling. A mortar was made by burning a bowl-shaped cavity in the even end of an upright block of wood. After thoroughly...
Page 62 - Jones be, and the same is, hereby organized, from and after the first day of June next, and the inhabitants of said county be entitled to all the rights and privileges to which by law the inhabitants of other organized counties of this Territory are entitled; and the said county shall be...
Page 27 - For doors and windows, the most simple contrivances that would serve the purpose were brought into requisition. The door was not always immediately provided with a shutter, and a blanket often did duty in guarding the entrance. But as soon as convenient, some boards were split and put together, hung upon wooden hinges and held shut by a wooden pin inserted in an auger hole. As...
Page 39 - But the hound was never known to recognize a flag of truce ; his baying seemed to signify " no quarter," or at least so the terrified wolf understood it. Smaller animals, such as panthers, lynxes, wildcats, catamounts and polecats, were also sufficiently numerous to be troublesome. And an exceeding source of annoyance were the swarms of mosquitoes which aggravated the trials of the settler in the most exasperating degree. Persons have been driven from the labors of the field by their unmerciful assaults.

Bibliographic information