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Books Books 1 - 10 of 136 on Pisgah, to view from this wilderness a more goodly country to feed their hopes ;....  
" Pisgah, to view from this wilderness a more goodly country to feed their hopes ; for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to the heavens) they could have little solace or content in respect of any outward objects. "
New-England's Memorial - Page 35
by Nathaniel Morton - 1826 - 481 pages
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New-England's Memorial

Nathaniel Morton, William Bradford, Thomas Prince, Edward Winslow - Massachusetts - 1669 - 515 pages
...they, as it were, go up to the top of Pisgah, to view from this wilderness a more goodly country to feed their hopes ; for which way soever they turned...all things stand in appearance with a weather-beaten face, and the whole country full of woods and thickets, represented a wild and savage hue ; if they...
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Democracy in America, Volume 1

Alexis de Tocqueville - Democracy - 1838 - 464 pages
...knew not : for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward...all things stand in appearance with a weather-beaten face, and the whole country full of woods and thickets represented a wild and savage hue ; if they...
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The British and Foreign Review: Or, European Quarterly Journal, Volume 7

History - 1838
...then knew not; for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to Heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward...things stand, in appearance, with a weather-beaten face, and the whole country full of woods and thickets represented a wilde and savage hew ; if they...
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Democracy in America, Volume 1

Alexis de Tocqueville - Democracy - 1838
...wilderness, full of wilde beasts and wilde men? and what multitudes of them there were, they then knew not : for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to Heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward object ; for summer being ended, all things...
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The Canadian Question

Gilbert Ainslie Young - Canada - 1839 - 83 pages
...wilderness, full of wilde beasts and wilde men ? and what multitudes of them there were they then knew not ; for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to Heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward object ; for summer being ended, all things...
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Chronicles of the Pilgrim Fathers of the Colony of Plymouth: From 1602-1625

Massachusetts - 1841 - 504 pages
...~ their hopes. For which way soever they turned their 1020. e y es (save upward to the heavens) they could have little solace or content in respect of any outward objects. For summer being done, all things stand for them to look upon with a weather-beaten face;...
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Lights and Shadows of American History, Part 2

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - America - 1844 - 320 pages
...they, as it were, go up to the top of Pisgah, to view from this wilderness a more goodly country, to feed their hopes. For which way soever they turned their eyes, save upward to the heavens, they could have little solace or content in respect of any outward objects. For summer...
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A Pictorial History of America: Embracing Both the Northern and Southern ...

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - America - 1844 - 813 pages
...they, as it were, go up to the top of Pisgah, to view from this wilderness a more goodly country to feed their hopes ; for which way soever they turned their eyes, save upwards to heaven, they could have little solace or content in respect of any outward object; for summer...
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Methodism in America: with the personal narrative of the author, during a ...

James Dixon - Canada - 1849 - 498 pages
...knew not ; for, which way soever they turned their eyes, (save upwards to heaven,) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward object ; for, summer being ended, all things stared in appearance with a weather-beaten face ; and the whole country, full of woods and thickets,...
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Democracy in America: In Relation to Political Institutions

Alexis de Tocqueville - Democracy - 1850 - 460 pages
...full of wilde beasts, and wilde men ? and what multitudes of them there were, they then knew not : for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to Heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward object ; for summer being ended, all things...
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