The Cambridge World History of Slavery: Volume 3, AD 1420-AD 1804

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David Eltis, Keith Bradley, Stanley L. Engerman, Paul Cartledge
Cambridge University Press, Jul 25, 2011 - History - 762 pages
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"Most societies in the past have had slaves, and almost all peoples have at some time in their pasts been both slaves as well as owners of slaves. Recent decades have seen a significant increase in our understanding of the historical role played by slavery and wide interest across a range of academic disciplines in the evolution of the institution. Exciting and innovative research methodologies have been developed, and numerous fruitful debates generated. Further, the study of slavery has come to provide strong connections between academic research and the wider public interest at a time when such links have in general been weak. The Cambridge World History of Slavery responds to these trends by providing for the first time, in four volumes, a comprehensive global history of this widespread phenomenon from the ancient world to the present day. Volume I surveys the history of slavery in the ancient Mediterranean world. Although chapters are devoted to the ancient Near East and the Jews, its principal concern is with the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. These are often considered as the first examples in world history of genuine slave societies because of the widespread prevalence of chattel slavery, which is argued to have been a cultural manifestation of the ubiquitous violence in societies typified by incessant warfare"--Provided by publisher.
  

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Contents

1 DEPENDENCE SERVILITY AND COERCED LABOR IN TIME AND SPACE
1
PART I SLAVERY IN AFRICA AND ASIA MINOR
23
PART II SLAVERY IN ASIA
161
PART III SLAVERY AMONG THE INDIGENOUS AMERICANS
215
PART IV SLAVERY AND SERFDOM IN EASTERN EUROPE
273
PART V SLAVERY IN THE AMERICAS
323
PART VI CULTURAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC PATTERNS IN THE AMERICAS
477
PART VII LEGAL STRUCTURES ECONOMICS AND THE MOVEMENT OF COERCED PEOPLES IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD
561
PART VIII SLAVERY AND RESISTANCE
675
Index
741
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

David Eltis is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University and research associate of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University. He has also held visiting appointments at Harvard and Yale universities. Eltis received his Ph.D. from the University of Rochester in 1979. He is most recently author of The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas and co-compiler of The Transatlantic Slave Trade: A Database on CD-ROM and its successor on www.slavevoyages.org. He co-edited Extending the Frontiers: Essays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database (with David Richardson) and Slavery in the Development of the Americas (with Frank D. Lewis and Kenneth L. Sokoloff) and edited Coerced and Free Migrations: Global Perspectives.

Stanley L. Engerman is John H. Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History at the University of Rochester. He has also previously taught at Yale, Oxford and Cambridge universities. Engerman received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University in 1962. He is the author of Slavery, Emancipation, and Freedom: Comparative Perspectives and the co-author of Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery (with Robert Fogel) and Naval Blockades in Peace and War: An Economic History Since 1750 (with Lance E. Davis). He is also co-editor of A Historical Guide to World Slavery (with Seymour Drescher), Finance, Intermediaries, and Economic Development (with Philip T. Hoffman, Jean-Laurent Rosenthal and Kenneth L. Sokoloff) and The Cambridge Economic History of the United States (with Robert E. Gallman).

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