The Voice of the Poor: Essays in Economic and Political Persuasion

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Harvard University Press, 1983 - Business & Economics - 96 pages
1 Review
What is surprising about these essays is not the insight and grace with which they are written--we have come to expect that--but the fact that nobody has expressed matters in quite this way before. John Kenneth Galbraith writes about what advice the poor nations (as, avoiding euphemism, he calls them) ought to offer to the more fortunate countries...In this little book there are essential lessons to ponder--for the governments of the rich countries, for those of the poor lands, and for the concerned citizens of both.
  

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Contents

Of Wealth and Wisdom
1
The Second Imperial Requiem
25
The Military Nexus
46
Historical Process and the Rich
65
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

John Kenneth Galbraith is a Canadian-born American economist who is perhaps the most widely read economist in the world. He taught at Harvard from 1934-1939 and then again from 1949-1975. An adviser to President John F. Kennedy, he served from 1961 to 1963 as U.S. ambassador to India. His style and wit in writing and his frequent media appearances have contributed greatly to his fame as an economist. Galbraith believes that it is not sufficient for government to manage the level of effective demand; government must manage the market itself. Galbraith stated in American Capitalism (1952) that the market is far from competitive, and governments and labor unions must serve as "countervailing power." He believes that ultimately "producer sovereignty" takes the place of consumer sovereignty and the producer - not the consumer - becomes ruler of the marketplace.

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