Religion and Violence: Philosophical Perspectives from Kant to Derrida

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Johns Hopkins University Press, Nov 16, 2001 - Philosophy - 443 pages
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Does violence inevitably shadow our ethico-political engagements and decisions, including our understandings of identity, whether collective or individual? Questions that touch upon ethics and politics can greatly benefit from being rephrased in terms borrowed from the arsenal of religious and theological figures, because the association of such figures with a certain violence keeps moralism, whether in the form of fideism or humanism, at bay. Religion and Violence: Philosophical Perspectives from Kant to Derrida's careful posing of such questions and rearticulations pioneers new modalities for systematic engagement with religion and philosophy alike.

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Contents

Horror Religiosus
1
Signum rememorativum demonstrativum
49
Paradoxical Topography of the University 57 Paganism
67
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Hent de Vries is professor of Modern European Thought in the Humanities Center and the Department of Philosophy at the Johns Hopkins University and professor of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam. Among his books are Philosophy and the Turn to Religion and Minimal Theologies: Critiques of Secular Reason in Adorno and Levinas, both available from Johns Hopkins. He is the co-editor, with Samuel Weber, of Violence, Identity, and Self-Determination and Religion and Media, and, with Mieke Bal, of the book series Cultural Memory in the Present.

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