Vintage Hughes

Front Cover
Vintage Books, Jan 1, 2004 - Poetry - 194 pages
14 Reviews
Vintage Readers are a perfect introduction to some of the great modern writers presented in attractive, accessible paperback editions.

“Langston Hughes is a titanic figure in 20th-century American literature . . . a powerful interpreter of the American experience.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer

Arguably the most important writer to emerge from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and ‘30s, Langston Hughes was a great poet and a shrewd and lively storyteller. His work blends elements of blues and jazz, speech and song, into a triumphant and wholly original idiom.

Vintage Hughesincludes the poems “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” “I, Too,” “The Weary Blues,” “America,” “Let America Be America Again,” “Dream Variations,” “Young Sailor,” “Afro-American Fragment,” “Scottsboro,” “The Negro Mother,” “Good Morning Revolution,” “I Dream a World,” “The Heart of Harlem,” “Freedom Train,” “Song for Billie Holliday,” “Nightmare Boogie,” “Africa,” “Black Panther,” “Birmingham Sunday,” and “UnAmerican Investigators”; and three stories from the collectionThe Ways of White Folks: “Cora Unashamed,” “Home,” and “The Blues I’m Playing.”

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
11
4 stars
1
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Vintage Hughes is great. Langston himself lends so much to history through his writings. I think I live and breath him. I have read and reread this book.

Review: Vintage Hughes

User Review  - Vanessa Thompson - Goodreads

I have read Langston Hughes work in school, at the time I didn't appreciate poetry or that type of writing. Now, as my artistic side begun to shine. I find myself geared toward poetry. Now, I truly appreciate his work. And own a few of his work of art. Read full review

Related books

Contents

From The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes
3
BRASS SPITTOONS
23
the negro mother
36
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Langston Hughes, February 1, 1902 - May 22, 1967 Langston Hughes, one of the foremost black writers to emerge from the Harlem Renaissance, was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Mo. Hughes briefly attended Columbia University before working numerous jobs including busboy, cook, and steward. While working as a busboy, he showed his poems to American poet Vachel Lindsay, who helped launch his career. He soon obtained a scholarship to Lincoln University and had several works published. Hughes is noted for his depictions of the black experience. In addition to the black dialect, he incorporated the rhythms of jazz and the blues into his poetry. While many recognized his talent, many blacks disapproved of his unflattering portrayal of black life. His numerous published volumes include, "The Weary Blues," "Fine Clothes to the Jew," and "Montage of a Dream Deferred." Hughes earned several awards during his lifetime including: a Guggenheim fellowship, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Grant, and a Spingarn Medal from the NAACP. Langston Hughes died of heart failure on May 22, 1967.

Bibliographic information