Manual of British Botany: Containing the Flowering Plants and Ferns Arranged According to Natural Orders (Google eBook)

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J. Van Voorst, 1843 - Botany - 400 pages
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Page v - Europe, must necessarily be made ; for it appeared that in very many cases the nomenclature employed in England was different from that used in other countries, that often plants considered as varieties here were held to be distinct species abroad, that several of our species were only looked upon as varieties by them, and also that the mode of grouping into genera was frequently essentially different. "The discovery of these facts produced considerable astonishment, and the author was led to consider...
Page vi - Linnaeus, and was thus enabled to ascertain, with very considerable accuracy, the British species which were known to that distinguished man, and to publish, in the most improved form that he had given to his system, a remarkably complete and excellent Flora of Britain. Then followed the long-continued separation of this country from France, and indeed from most of the European nations, by which we were almost completely prevented from observing the progress which botanical science was making in...
Page vi - ... At the conclusion of the war we had become so wedded to the system of Linnaeus, and it may even perhaps be allowable to add, so well satisfied with our own proficiency, that, with the honourable exception of Mr. Brown, there was at that time scarcely a botanist in Britain who took any interest in, or paid the least attention to, the classification by natural orders which had been adopted in France, and to the more minute and accurate examination of plants which was caused by the employment of...
Page vi - Linnsean work as the English Flora, greatly contributed to the permanency of this feeling ; and accordingly we find that, at a very recent period, working English botanists were unacquainted with any of the more modern continental floras, and indeed, even now, many of those works are only known by name to the great mass of the cultivators of British botany.
Page 406 - A CABINET EDITION OF THE HOLY BIBLE; THE AUTHORIZED VERSION, WITH TWENTY-FOUR HIGHLY-FINISHED STEEL ENGRAVINGS ; The Historical Subjects from the most esteemed Paintings of the Old Masters, and the Landscapes from Drawings, by W. WESTALL, ARA Price, in embossed binding, 10s.
Page v - had not advanced far in the critical examination of our native plants before he found that a careful comparison of indigenous specimens with the works of eminent continental authors, and with plants obtained from other parts of Europe, must necessarily be made, for it appeared that in very many cases the nomenclature employed in England was different from that used in other countries, that often plants considered as varieties here were held to be distinct species abroad, that several of our species...
Page 406 - In embossed binding, 10s. 6d. A CABINET EDITION OF THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER; The Authorized Version. With ten engravings, executed in the best manner, on steel. — In embossed binding, 4s., uniform with the Cabinet Bible.
Page 405 - A HISTORY OF THE FOSSIL FRUITS AND SEEDS OF THE LONDON CLAY.
Page 269 - Cornish Elm. Leaves obovate, cuspidate, cuneate at the base, evenly and nearly doubly crenate-serrate, strongly veined, coriaceous, very smooth and shining above, smooth beneath, with hairy axillae. Branches bright brown, smooth, rigid, erect, very compact. Fruit ..... £. parvifolia. Leaves much smaller, less oblique at the base, finely and regularly crenate, acuminate rather than cuspidate.
Page 405 - Diagram 3ft. 6in. by 2ft. 9 in.; showing the position and age of every deposit, and their "localities;" the classification of their Fossils, Metals, and Minerals; the statistics of Soils and indigenous Flora of each surface in Britain, &c. BY G. BARTLETT. — On roller or in case 25s. TRANSACTIONS OF THE MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. Part I.

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