Deep Church: A Third Way Beyond Emerging and Traditional (Google eBook)

Front Cover
InterVarsity Press, Sep 25, 2009 - Religion - 220 pages
29 Reviews
2010 Christianity Today Book Award winner! 2010 Golden Canon Leadership Book Award winner! Feeling caught between the traditional church and the emerging church? Discover a third way: deep church. C. S. Lewis used the phrase "deep church" to describe the body of believers committed to mere Christianity. Unfortunately church in our postmodern era has been marked by a certain shallowness. Emerging authors, fed up with contemporary pragmatism, have offered alternative visions for twenty-first-century Christianity. Traditionalist churches have reacted negatively, at times defensively. Jim Belcher knows what it's like to be part of both of these worlds. In the 1990s he was among the pioneers of what was then called Gen X ministry, hanging out with creative innovators like Rob Bell, Mark Oestreicher and Mark Driscoll. But he also has maintained ties to traditionalist circles, planting a church in the Presbyterian Church of America. In Deep Church, Belcher brings the best insights of all sides to forge a third way between emerging and traditional. In a fair and evenhanded way, Belcher explores the proposals of such emerging church leaders as Tony Jones, Brian McLaren and Doug Pagitt. He offers measured appreciation and affirmation as well as balanced critique. Moving beyond reaction, Belcher provides constructive models from his own church planting experience and paints a picture of what this alternate, deep church looks like--a missional church committed to both tradition and contemporary culture, valuing innovation in worship, arts and community but also adhering to creeds and confessions. If you've felt stuck between two extremes, you can find a home here. Plumb the depths of Christianity in a way that neither rejects our postmodern context nor capitulates to it. Instead of veering to the left or the right, go between the extremes--and go deep.
  

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The writing style: engaging. - Goodreads
So my frame of reference was a bit off for this book. - Goodreads
I could have used the insight. - Goodreads
Thank you, Jim Belcher, for writing this book. - Goodreads

Review: Deep Church: A Third Way Beyond Emerging and Traditional

User Review  - Julie Nonyas - Goodreads

It is just beautiful. He wrote this above my normal reading area (google has been my study mate). But the message and mission are just amazing, it is the heartbeat of the future. If we can build these ... Read full review

Review: Deep Church: A Third Way Beyond Emerging and Traditional

User Review  - Steven Wedgeworth - Goodreads

I just read this again for the second time and still feel that it is an important and practical book for church leaders. I don't agree quite with all of his thoughts on philosophy, finding them to ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Richard J Mouw
7
Is a Third Way Possible?
9
MAPPING NEW TERRITORY
17
There from the Start How to Be an Insider and an Outsider at the Same Time
19
Defining the Emerging Church
35
The Quest for Mere Christianity
51
PROTEST REACTION AND THE DEEP CHURCH
69
Deep Truth
71
Deep Gospel
105
Deep Worship
123
Deep Preaching
141
Deep Ecclesiology
161
Deep Culture
181
Becoming the Deep Church
199
Acknowledgments
209
Notes
211

Deep Evangelism
91

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About the author (2009)

Jim Belcher (Ph.D., Georgetown) is associate professor of practical theology at Knox Theological Seminary. He is the founding and former lead pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Newport Beach, California, where he served from 2000-2010 and led a period of steady growth. He is the author of the award-winning book Deep Church (IVP, 2009).

Mouw is president of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. Before coming to Fuller in 1985 as professor of Christian philosophy and ethics, he was for seventeen years professor of philosophy at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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