Social and Gender Analysis in Natural Resource Management: Learning Studies and Lessons from Asia

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IDRC, Jan 1, 2006 - Business & Economics - 250 pages
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Documents and reflects on the steps that researchers are taking to implement social and gender analysis, including questions of class, caste, and ethnicity, into their everyday work. Combines both learning experiences and scientific results, representing academic and nonacademic sectors, a variety of research organizations, and a number of natural resource management questions, including biodiversity conservation, crop and livestock improvement, and sustainable grassland development. The learning studies, from China, India, Mongolia, Nepal, and Viet Nam, illustrate challenges, opportunities, successes, and disappointments, and highlight the different methods used and adapted in the diverse contexts of South and Southeast Asia. Concludes with a comparative analysis of the learning studies, which highlights common issues and challenges.
  

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Page 36 - P., ed. (2003). Women and Plants: Gender Relations in Biodiversity Management and Conservation. London: Zed Books.
Page 163 - Nguyen villagers lived in a remote, inaccessible mountain valley with a very rich forest area near the Viet NamLaos border. When they were resettled, they were allocated unproductive imperata grasslands or wastelands that needed to be converted to agricultural fields, and this is a long and difficult process. They also received some farming tools and food to help them begin their new lives. So, unlike Hong Ha villagers, who moved back to their own homelands after the war, Huong Nguyen villagers were...
Page 26 - Founder and Director of the Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy (CCAP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Page 21 - ... Structural adjustment in some countries is leading to reductions in the technical and enforcement capability of the State. In others, major policy transitions are affecting all aspects of government interventions in the economy also leading to more local control and management of natural resources.
Page 21 - While circumstances vary in different countries, there is a striking convergence of interest in questions of local resource management. Structural adjustment in some countries is leading to reductions in the technical and enforcement capability of the State. In others, major policy transitions are affecting all aspects of government interventions in the economy (Kristof and WuDunn 2000).
Page 19 - NGO staff and policy makers at different levels who together analyze problems and define research and development initiatives and work towards reconciling conflicting or diverging points of views and interests. In particular, the active involvement of NGOs, local governments, grassroots groups and farmer associations is now a feature in many, participatory, natural resource management research projects.
Page 127 - T. 2000. Farmer decision making and genetic diversity: Linking multidisciplinary research to implementation on-farm.
Page 20 - Problems related to the sustainable management of natural resources are most critical in the uplands and coastal areas, where natural resource degradation can often lead to irreversible loss of food sources and the breakdown of ecosystems with loss of habitat.
Page 23 - Shifting the focus from fixed identities to positions of power and powerlessness opens up new possibilities for addressing issues of equity. In practical development terms, this shift implies more of a role for participatory approaches to explore, analyze, and work with the differences that people identify with, rather than for identifying the needs of predetermined categories of people.
Page 126 - ... biodiversity. The challenge of bridging the gap between improved local field experience and policy making remains. Our work aims to make a small contribution to this, but more efforts are required — by researchers, extensionists and policy makers alike. REFERENCES Adamo, A. and A. Horvoka (1998). Guidelines for Integrating Gender Analysis into Biodiversity Research: Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Program Initiative. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre. Brush, S.

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