History of the Indian Archipelago: Containing an Account of the Manners, Arts, Languages, Religions, Institutions, and Commerce of Its Inhabitants, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable and Company, 1820 - Austronesian languages - 35 pages
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Page 437 - It is remarkable that the Indian administration of one of the worst governments of Europe, and that in which the general principles of legislation and good government are least understood, one, too, which has never been skillfully executed, should, upon the whole, have proved the least injurious to the happiness and prosperity of the native inhabitants of the country. This, undoubtedly, has been the character of the Spanish connection with the Philippines, with all its vices, follies, and illiberalities;...
Page 437 - Almost every other country of the Archipelago is, at this day, in point of wealth, power, and civilization, in a worse state than when Europeans connected themselves with them three centuries back. The Philippines alone have improved in civilization, wealth, and populousness. When discovered most of the tribes were a race of half-naked savages, inferior to all the great tribes, who were pushing, at the same time, an active commerce, and enjoying a respectable share of the necessaries and comforts...
Page 10 - This distinction by no means implies a court or polished language, opposed to a vulgar or popular one, for both are equally polite and cultivated, and all depends on the relations in which the speakers stand to each other, as they happen to be inferiors or superiors. A servant addresses his master in the language of deference, a child his parent, a wife her husband, if there be much disparity in their ages, and the courtier his prince. The superior replies in the ordinary dialect...
Page 5 - ... comparatively recent times, along with the parent language, made some progress in Sumatra and Borneo. It is confessedly formed on the principles of the Sanskrit alphabet, but, unlike some other languages of the Archipelago, it has not followed the well known and artificial classification of that alphabet. The Javanese alphabet, as it relates to its own language, comes up to the notion of a perfect character, for it expresses every sound in the language, and every sound invariably with the same...
Page 10 - A servant addresses his master in the language of deference, a child his parent, a wife her husband, if there be much disparity in their ages, and the courtier his prince. The superior replies in the ordinary dialect, the language still affording modifications and distinctions, according to the rank of the person he addresses, until that rank rises to equality, when, if no intimacy subsists between the parties, the language of deference is adopted by both, or when, if there does, ceremony is thrown...
Page 75 - ... lowest and most abject state of social existence, though numerically few, are divided into a great many distinct tribes speaking as many different languages. Among the rude and scattered population of the island of Timor, it is believed that not less than forty languages are spoken On Ende and Flores we have also a multiplicity of languages ; and among the cannibal population of Borneo, it is not improbable that many hundreds are spoken.
Page 29 - ... it was a tomb. The body was dug for and found. It was still entire as when alive, and shed a perfume like a flower garden. The Hollanders bore it away to the camp, and placing it in a sitting posture in a chair, the officers took the corpse by the hand, saluting it according to the custom of their country, and tauntingly exclaiming, This is the hero Surapati, the mighty warrior, the enemy of the Dutch.
Page 237 - ... poignarded and consumed by fire. Each there found a particular scaffold prepared for her, nearly in the form of a trough, raised upon four short posts, and edged on two sides with planks. After moving three...
Page 437 - ... inhabitants of the country. This, undoubtedly, has been the character of the Spanish connection with the Philippines, with all its vices, follies, and illiberalities ; and the present condition of these islands affords an unquestionable proof of the fact. Almost every other country of the Archipelago is, at this day, in point of wealth, power, and civilization, in a worse state than when Europeans connected themselves with them three centuries back. The Philippines alone have improved in civilization,...
Page 193 - ... with corresponding terraces, three circular rows of latticed cages of hewn stone, in the form of beehives, and finally, of the dome already mentioned. * * * There is no concavity except in the dome. The hill is in fact a sort of nucleus for the. temple, and has been cut away and fashioned for the accommodation of the building."* The same author, from whom this description is taken, mentions another class of Javanese temples. "They may generally be described...

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