New York

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Sun & Moon Press, 1989 - Fiction - 354 pages
2 Reviews
These pieces were originally published in newspapers and magazines during the years 1912-1919

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Review: New York

User Review  - Elizabeth - Goodreads

The essay on force-feeding suffragists who were on hunger strike may be the most disturbing thing I have ever, and was what drew me to the collection of essays in the first place. In the end, I wasn't quite able to finish it and skipped a few of the essays and returned it to the library. Read full review

Review: New York

User Review  - Oscar - Goodreads

A great collection of prose essays that are remarkable for their lack of meditation. Barnes gathers stories from all walks of life and varied points from NYC's post WWI landscape and brings them together in a natural style that always keeps the story in the center stage. Read full review

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About the author (1989)

Although Djuna Barnes was a New Yorker who spent much of her long life in Greenwich Village, where she died a virtual recluse in 1982, she resided for extended periods of time in France and England. Her writings are representative modernist works in that they seem to transcend all national boundaries to take place in a land peculiarly her own. Deeply influenced by the French symbolists of the late nineteenth century and by the surrealists of the 1930s, she also wrote as a liberated woman, whose unconventional way of life is reflected in the uncompromising individuality of her literary style. Barnes's dreamlike and haunted writings have never found a wide popular audience, but they have strongly influenced such writers as Rebecca West, Nelson Algren, Dahlberg, Lowry, Miller, and especially Nin, in whose works a semifictional character named Djuna sometimes appears. In 1915 Barnes anonymously published The Book of Repulsive Women. Not long after she moved to Paris and became associated with the colony of writers and artists who made that city the international center of culture during the 1920s and early 1930s. Her Ladies Almanack was privately printed in Paris in 1928, the same year that Liveright in the United States published Ryder, her first novel. The book on which Barnes's fame largely rests is Nightwood (1936), a surrealistic story set in Paris and the United States, dealing with the complex relationships among a group of strangely obsessed characters, most of them homosexuals and lesbians. Barnes wrote little after Nightwood. In 1952, she professed to Malcolm Lowry that the experience of writing that searing work so frightened her that she was unable to write anything after it. Fortunately, her literary talents revived with The Antiphon, a verse-drama originally published in 1958, which is now available in Selected Works (1962).

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