Emma

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Penguin, Dec 31, 2002 - Fiction - 474 pages
42 Reviews
The definitive text of Jane Austen's penetrating and sparkling satire, Emma, this Penguin Classics edition includes an introduction by Fiona Stafford.Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, rich - and fiercely independent - is perfectly content with her life and sees no need for either love or marriage. Nothing, however, delights her more than interfering in the romantic lives of others. But when she ignores the advice of her good friend Mr Knightley and attempts to arrange a suitable match for her pretty, naļve Harriet Smith, her well-laid plans soon unravel and have consequences that she never expected. With its imperfect but charming heroine, and its witty and subtle exploration of relationships, Emma is often seen as Jane Austen's most flawless work.Edited with an introduction by Fiona Stafford, this edition includes a chronology, additional suggestions for further reading, and the original Penguin Classics introduction by Tony Tanner. Jane Austen (1775-1817) was extremely modest about her own genius but has become one of English literature's most famous women writers. Austen began writing at a young age, embarking on what is possibly her best-known work, Pride and Prejudice, at the age of 22. She was also the author of Sense and Sensibility, Persuasion, Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park. If you enjoyed Emma, you may like Charlotte Brontė's Villette, also available in Penguin Classics. 'These modern editions are to be strongly recommended for their scrupulous texts, informative notes and helpful introductions'Brian Southam, the Jane Austen Society 'The author of Emma ... has produced sketches of such spirit and originality that ... in this class she stands almost alone'Sir Walter Scott
  

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User Review  - Sindhu Sharma - Flipkart

Jane Austen is a wonderful author and it is not justified to read her works in a poorly published book. There are too many typing errors which makes the prose difficult to comprehend. It is advisable to not go for this publication simply because the price is low compared to other publications. Read full review

Review: The Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen: 6-Volume Set

User Review  - A - Goodreads

I have been a fan of Jane Austen for years. It a great day when my daughters decided to read her books. She was a person with amazing insight on human nature. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

The Penguin Edition of the Novels of Jane Austen
vii
Chronology
ix
Introduction
xi
Further Reading
xxix
Note on the Text
xxxiv
Volume One
5
Volume Two
143
Volume Three
293
Emendations to the Text
455
Notes
457
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775 at Steventon near Basingstoke, the seventh child of the rector of the parish. She lived with her family at Steventon until they moved to Bath when her father retired in 1801. After his death in 1805, she moved around with her mother; in 1809, they settled in Chawton, near Alton, Hampshire. Here she remained, except for a few visits to London, until in May 1817 she moved to Winchester to be near her doctor. There she died on July 18, 1817.

As a girl Jane Austen wrote stories, including burlesques of popular romances. Her works were only published after much revision, four novels being published in her lifetime. These are Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816). Two other novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, were published posthumously in 1818 with a biographical notice by her brother, Henry Austen, the first formal announcement of her authorship. Persuasion was written in a race against failing health in 1815-16. She also left two earlier compositions, a short epistolary novel, Lady Susan, and an unfinished novel, The Watsons. At the time of her death, she was working on a new novel, Sanditon, a fragmentary draft of which survives.

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