A Little Journey to the Home of Elder Pardon Tillinghast (Google eBook)

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Standard Print., 1908 - 27 pages
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This book has been extremely helpful in my research of the Tilllinghast family.

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Page 16 - For freedom of conscience, the town was first planted, Persuasion, not force, was used by the people. This church is the eldest, and has not recanted, Enjoying and granting, bell, temple and steeple.
Page 13 - ... Tillinghast, the minister of the church, built at his own expense a meeting-house, on a lot near the corner of North Main and Smith streets. This house and lot he afterwards generously deeded to the church. The building, according to tradition, was small and rude, "in the shape of a hay-cap, with a fire-place in the middle, the smoke escaping from a hole in the roof...
Page 8 - that every man had a right to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience, and had founded a plantation at the head of Narragansett Bay which he named Providence "in grateful remembrance of God's providence to me in my distress.
Page 16 - ... was first planted, Persuasion, not force, was used by the people. This church is the eldest, and has not recanted, Enjoying and granting, bell, temple and steeple." This bell was split in ringing, in 1787.
Page 14 - Tillinghast, (in his life-time) who was a man exemplary for his doctrine, as well as of an unblemished character, did several times in his teaching declare, that it was the duty of a church to contribute towards the maintenance of their elders, who labored in the word and doctrine of Christ ; and although for his own part he would take nothing, yet it remained the church's duty to be performed to such as might succeed him.
Page 5 - Charles' order to the clergy to read in church the declaration of sports, in which the king directed that no hindrance should be thrown in the way of those who wished to dance or shoot at the butts (a target) on Sunday afternoon.
Page 14 - He was the innocentest, best old soul I ever see. But it warn't surprising, because he warn't only just a farmer, he was a preacher, too, and had a little one-horse log church down back of the plantation, which he built it himself at his own expense for a church and schoolhouse, and never charged nothing for his preaching, and it was worth it, too.
Page 10 - Streets. lanes were laid out between the lots, allowing passage for the cattle going back on the hill to pasture. All the houses were a story or a story and a half in height, with a large chimney at one end. Generally the houses had but one room below and a chamber in the half story or attic, access to the chamber being obtained by ladder. At the rear of the houses, where Benefit Street now runs, each proprietor, independent to the last, laid out a...

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