Managing Enterprise Content: A Unified Content Strategy

Front Cover
New Riders, 2003 - Computers - 565 pages
6 Reviews

Today's businesses are overwhelmed with the need to create more content, faster, cutomized for more customers, and for more media than ever before. Managing Enterprise Content: A Unified Content Strategy provides the concepts, strategies, guidelines, processes, and technological options that will prepare enterprise content managers and authors to meet the increasing demands of creating, managing, and distributing content.

Author Ann Rockley, along with the Rockley Group team, provides techniques that will help you define your content management requirements, build your vision, design your content architecture, pick the right tools, and overcome the hurdles of managing enterprise content. This book will help you visualize the broad spectrum of enterprise content, the requirements for effectively creating, managing, and delivering content, and the value of developing a unified content strategy for your organization.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
2
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Managing Enterprise Content: A Unified Content Strategy

User Review  - Gayle - Goodreads

The Rockley Group really is a group of experts when it comes to content. I remember reading the first edition of this book and wondering how I'd ever be able to apply it. They were so far out ahead of ... Read full review

Review: Managing Enterprise Content: A Unified Content Strategy

User Review  - Marcia Johnston - Goodreads

For all you professional writers who struggle with managing mountains of information at work—whether you write technical manuals, marketing literature, training materials, service guides, online help ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The basis of a unified content strategy
1
Content The lifeblood of an organization
3
Where does it all come from?
4
Understanding the Content Silo Trap
5
A unified content strategy
12
Components of a unified content strategy
16
Where does a unified content strategy fit?
17
Scope of a unified content strategy
19
The role of XML
281
A brief history of XML
282
What is XML?
284
A look at XML
285
Importance of XML to a unified content strategy
289
Summary
296
Authoring tools
297
An overview of authoring tools
298

Summary
20
Fundamental concepts of reuse
23
What is content reuse?
24
The historical foundation for reuse
26
Reuse methods
29
When doesnt reuse make sense?
41
Summary
42
Assessing return on investment for a unified content strategy
43
Addressing the goals
44
Calculating investment costs
54
Calculating return on investment
60
Summary
62
Performing a substantive audit Determining business requirements
63
Where does it really hurt?
65
Identifying the dangers opportunities and strengths
67
Identifying the goals
72
Identifying the challenges
73
Where a unified content strategy wont help
75
Summary
78
Analyzing the content life cycle
79
Your task
80
Identifying your content life cycle
81
Identifying the players and issues
86
Summary
101
Performing a content audit
103
What is a content audit?
104
Whats involved in doing a content audit?
105
Content audit examples
108
Building a reuse map
121
What comes after the audit?
123
Summary
125
Envisioning your unified content life cycle
127
Addressing issues
128
Sample unified content life cycles
134
Summary
155
Design
157
Information modeling
159
Understanding information architecture
160
Modeling based on analysis
161
Understanding granularity
165
Information product and element models
166
Components of models
170
How are models used?
175
Summary
181
Designing metadata
183
What is metadata?
184
Types of metadata
186
Creating a controlled vocabulary
199
Ensuring metadata gets used
200
Summary
201
Designing dynamic content
203
Why dynamic content?
204
When does dynamic content make sense?
205
Examples of dynamic content
206
Supporting dynamic content
208
Systematic reuse
222
Summary
224
Designing workflow
227
What is workflow?
228
Benefits of workflow
229
Depicting workflow
231
Roles responsibilities and processes
233
Designing effective workflow
240
Summary
243
Implementing your design
245
Factors affecting implementation
246
Physical granularity
248
Options for implementation
249
Semantic versus generic element or style names
254
Metadata
259
Style sheets
260
Summary
263
Tools and technologies
265
Evaluating tools
267
Identifying your needs
268
Creating a list of potential vendors
274
Narrowing down the list
275
One size fits all?
279
Summary
280
Capabilities and requirements for unified content
300
Criteria for selection
309
Summary
310
Content management systems
311
The content management process
312
The types of content management systems
323
Summary
333
Workflow systems
335
Creation
337
Processing
338
Administration
341
Security and electronic signature
342
Other considerations
347
Summary
348
Delivery systems
351
Capabilities
352
Aggregation
353
Conversion
356
Assembly
357
Automation
360
Summary
361
Moving to a unified content strategy
363
Collaborative authoring Breaking down the silos
365
What is collaboration?
366
What does collaborative authoring require?
368
Summary
376
Separating content from format
379
Why separate content from format?
380
Writing structured content
382
Applying the model
388
Same content different uses?
392
Summary
399
Managing change
401
Change management
402
Overcoming resistance
405
Why some projects fail
408
Changing roles
412
Summary
418
Transition plan
419
Scoping your unified content strategy
420
Structure without structured authoring tools
423
Working with a limited budget
424
A phased approach
426
Summary
428
Resources
429
Glossary
431
Bibliography
445
Checklist for implementing a unified content strategy
449
Phase 1Analysis
450
Phase 2Design
453
Phase 3Selecting tools and technologies
457
Phase 4Development
460
Phase 5Testing and system modifications
466
Phase 6Pilot
470
Phase 7Implementation
474
Phase 8Postimplementation
477
Writing for multiple media
479
Writing online documentation
480
Writing for the Web
482
Writing for paper
483
Summarizing the guidelines
484
Conclusion
486
Vendors
487
Authoring systems
488
Content management systems
493
Workflow systems
499
Delivery systems
503
Tools checklist
507
Authoring tool functionality
508
Content management
515
Workflow
523
Delivery
529
Content Relationships
533
Basic relationships
534
Complex relationships
535
Managing the complexity
537
Conclusion
538
Index
539
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Ann Rockley is President of The Rockley Group, Inc. Ann has an international reputation in the single sourcing movement and in the fields of content management, e-content, and e-learning. Ann is doing ground-breaking work in the field of information design for content reuse and enterprise content management. She regularly speaks at dozens of conferences around the world on the topics of single sourcing, content management, and e-content. Ann is an Associate Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication and has a Master of Information Science from the University of Toronto. She teaches Enterprise Content Management at the University of Toronto.

Bibliographic information