Practical Elocution: Containing Illustrations of the Principles of Reading and Public Speaking ... (Google eBook)

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Merriam, Moore, 1846 - Elocution - 350 pages
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Contents

Climax _
44
Gesture or Rhetorical Action
46
Remarks on the Inflections of the Voice with examples
50
SELECT PIECES FOR EXERCISES 1 Elocution Dr Charming
55
Elocution of Ladies Mrs Sigourney
56
Elocution its effects upon Health Dr A Combe
57
The Voice Journal of Health
59
Demosthenes Charles Rollin
61
Cicero N Amer Review
63
Eloquence its true nature D Webster
67
Eloquence of the Pulpit Dr Rush
68
Taste for Reading Sir J Herschell
69
A Rabbinical Tale Dr Franklin
70
Education Governor Seward
72
Hamlets Instruction to the Players Shakspeare
74
Tells Address to the Mountains Knowles
75
Address to the Sun Ossian
77
Address to the Ocean Byron
79
Speech of King Henry V Shakspeare
80
The Grave James Montgomery
82
Satans supposed Speech Milton
84
Apostrophe to Light Milton
85
Speech of Lord Chancellor Thurlow
87
Defence before Agrippa St Paul
88
Supposed Speech of John Adams D Webster
91
Description of the person of Jesus Christ Josephus
93
The Blind Preacher William Wirt
95
Davids Lamentation over Saul and Jonathan
97
Catos Soliloquy Addison
99
Imaginary meeting of Satan Sin and Death Milton
101
Adam and Eves Morning Hymn Milton
104
Speech of Cassius Shakspeare
106
Brutus Oration on the Death of Caesar Shakspeare
107
Antonys Oration over Caesars body Shakspeare
109
The Burial of Sir John Moore Wolfe
112
Last Words of Robert Emmet
113
Lines relating to Currans Daughter Thomas Moore
114
The Temperance Reformation a Harbinger of the Millennium Rev Dr Sprague
115
B Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson
117
Patriotic Speech on the question of War with England P Henry
122
Cardinal Wolseys Soliloquy on Ambition Shakspeare
125
Cardinal Wolseys Farewell Address to Cromwell Shakspeare
126
Speech to Joseph Judah
127
Announcement of the Death of a Colleague George Mc Duffte
128
The right of Free Discussion derived from God Gerrit Smith
130
Address to the Moon Ossian
133
Education Charles Phillips
134
Conclusion of Henry Clays Speech at Lexington Ken
136
Petition of the Wife of Almas Ali Cawn to Warren Hastings
138
Speech of William Pitt Earl of Chatham
139
Night before and Battle of Waterloo Byron
141
Right of Free Discussion D Webster
143
Extract from Gen Jacksons Proclamation
145
Woodman Spare that Tree Geoge P Morris
147
The Union D Webster
148
Marco Bozzaris J G Halleck
149
Speech of Edmund Burke
151
Lines for the Fourth of July Jlnonymous
162
A Beautiful Gem E K Hervey
163
How Scholars are made D Webster
164
Books _ Dr Channing
165
Gilbert Motierde Lafayette J Q Adams
166
Part of a Speech of Elisha Williams
167
On Knowledge De Witt Clinton
168
The importance of Female Influence in the Temperance Cause Chancellor Walworth 169
169
Speech of a Mingo Chief lagan
172
lady Randolphs Soliloquy Rev John Home
173
Byrons Farewell to his Wife
174
Song of the German Soldiers after victory Mrs F D Hemans
176
Defence of Socrates before his Judges
177
Part of the Burial Service Bible
179
The Dream of Clarence Shakapeare
181
Virginius and Lucius J S Knowles
183
Scene from Pizarro Kotzebue
187
Dialogue from the History of King Richard III Knickerbocker
191
89 Scene between Captain Bertram and Jack Bowlin Dunlap
192
Alexander the Great and a Robber Dr Aikin
196
Prince Henry and Falstaff Shakapeare
197
A Scene from William Tell Knowles
200
Extract from Damon and Pythias Shiel
205
Isabella pleading before Angelo Shakspeare
208
Mutual Upbraidings of Edward and Warwick Dr T Franklin
213
Hamlet and Horatio Shakspeare
216
Othello and Iago Shakapeare
219
Alonzos Soliloquy Dr Edward Young
221
Death of Alexander Hamilton Eliphalet Nott
223
Our Federal Union its inestimable value President Polk
224
Man George Combe
227
To Mary in Heaven Robert Barns
229
The Christians Hope Rev A Sutton
231
Rues for the structure of a Sentence Alexander Walker
232
Heavens Attractions Dr Nevis
233
Eloquent Speech against Warren Hastings Sheridan
236
Panegyric on Sheridans Eloquence Burke
239
New Missionary Hymn S F Smith
240
Davids Confidence in Gods Grace
241
Of Elocution Thelwal
244
Divinely inspired Speakers their Elocution Rev David Marks
246
Patienoe under provocations our interest as well as duty Dr Blair
250
t The Daughters Request Anonymous
252
The Universal Prayer Pope
254
Reflections at Sea Rev Howard Malcom
256
Speech to the Ladies D Webster
257
The Snow Storm Portland Argus
259
Extract from the Charge preceding the Sentence of the Court in the case of the threeThayers Hon R H Walworth
261
Presidents of the United States Samuel N Sweet
264
Advantages of Knowledge S N Sweet
268
Disadvantages of Ignorance S N Sweet
270
Extract from the Mount Hope Dedication Address Rev P Church
273
Reflections on the death of a Friend C M Thayer
278
Education the Principle of all Prosperity Rev Robert Hall
281
Character of George Washington Thomas Jefferson
283
The last hours of Washington G W P Custis
285

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Page 111 - I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts; I am no orator, as Brutus is, But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him. For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men's blood: I only speak right on...
Page 142 - Ah ! then and there was hurrying to and fro, And gathering tears, and tremblings of distress, And cheeks all pale, which but an hour ago Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness; And there were sudden partings, such as press The life from out young hearts, and choking sighs Which ne'er might be repeated...
Page 105 - Join voices, all ye living Souls : Ye Birds, That singing up to Heaven-gate ascend, Bear on your wings and in your notes his praise. Ye that in waters glide, and ye that walk The earth, and stately tread, or lowly creep ; Witness if I be silent, morn or even, To hill, or valley, fountain, or fresh shade, Made vocal by my song, and taught his praise. Hail, universal Lord, be bounteous still To give us only good ; and if the night Have gather'd aught of evil, or conceal'd, Disperse it, as now light...
Page 111 - That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men's blood: I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
Page 126 - Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries ; but thou hast forced me, Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman. Let's dry our eyes : and thus far hear me, Cromwell ; And, when I am forgotten, as I shall be ; And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention Of me more must be heard of, say, I taught thee...
Page 294 - When thoughts Of the last bitter hour come like a blight Over thy spirit, and sad images Of the stern agony and shroud and pall And breathless darkness and the narrow house Make thee to shudder and grow sick at heart...
Page 348 - And surely your blood of your lives will I require : at the hand of every beast will I require it, and at the hand of man ; at the hand of every man's brother will I require the life of man. Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed : for in the image of God made he man.
Page 304 - If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union, or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated, where reason is left free to combat it.
Page 154 - Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests ; which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates ; but parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole ; where, not local purposes, not local prejudices ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole.
Page 111 - And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts. I am no orator, as Brutus is, But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him.

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