Green grass, running water

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Bantam Books, 1994 - Fiction - 469 pages
151 Reviews
Strong, Sassy women and hard-luck hardheaded men, all searching for the middle ground between Native American tradition and the modern world, perform an elaborate dance of approach and avoidance in this magical, rollicking tale by Cherokee author Thomas King. Alberta is a university professor who would like to trade her two boyfriends for a baby but no husband; Lionel is forty and still sells televisions for a patronizing boss; Eli and his log cabin stand in the way of a profitable dam project. These three—and others—are coming to the Blackfoot reservation for the Sun Dance and there they will encounter four Indian elders and their companion, the trickster Coyote—and nothing in the small town of Blossom will be the same again…

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I love stories with happy endings! - Goodreads
Confusing odd but fun writing . - Goodreads
I loved his character development. - Goodreads
It has a great plot and fun characters. - Goodreads
Quick pace with rapid changes of setting and tone. - Goodreads
His writing style is brilliant. - Goodreads

Review: Green Grass, Running Water

User Review  - Anna - Goodreads

Being a big fan of The Dead Dog Cafe Comedy Hour (the old CBC throwback aboriginal comedy show that starred author Thomas King alongside 'Gracie Heavy Hand' and 'Jasper Friendly Bear' doing such ... Read full review

Review: Green Grass, Running Water

User Review  - Barbwire Sugarbeet - Goodreads

I felt deceived, but in a good way, by reading this book. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
7
Section 3
10
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Thomas King is of Cherokee, Greek, and German descent and is currently chair of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. His short stories have been widely published throughout the United States and Canada, and a film, based on his much acclaimed first novel Medicine River, has been made for television.