Historical and topographical description of Repton, in the county of Derby (Google eBook)

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Woodfall & Kinder, 1854 - 409 pages
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Page 111 - A stranger yet to pain ! I feel the gales that from ye blow, A momentary bliss bestow, As, waving fresh their gladsome wing, My weary soul they seem to sooth, And, redolent of joy and youth, To breathe a second spring.
Page 144 - Those joyous hours are past away ; And many a heart, that then was gay, Within the tomb now darkly dwells, And hears no more those evening bells. And so 'twill be when I am gone ; That tuneful peal will still ring on, While other bards shall walk these dells, And sing your praise, sweet...
Page 184 - I find it thus far experimentally true, that at my now being in that school, and seeing that very place where I sat when I was a boy, occasioned me to remember those very thoughts of my youth which then possessed me : sweet thoughts indeed, that promised my growing years numerous pleasures, without mixtures of cares, and those to be enjoyed, when time which I therefore thought slow- paced had changed my youth into manhood.
Page 250 - No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither with modesty enough, and likelihood to lead it; as thus: Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander returneth...
Page 208 - ... one body corporate and politic, in deed and in name, by the name of "The Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson's Bay...
Page 277 - There is no character more deservedly esteemed than that of a country gentleman who understands the station in which Heaven and Nature have placed him. He is father to his tenants, and patron to his neighbours, and is more superior to those of lower fortune. by his benevolence than his possessions.
Page xxiii - Philosophically considered, this ancient record is the second great phenomenon in the history of mankind. For, if we except the sacred annals of the Jews, contained in the several books of the Old Testament, there is no other work extant, ancient or modern, which exhibits at one view a regular and chronological panorama of a PEOPLE, described in rapid succession by different writers, through so many ages, in their own vernacular LANGUAGE.
Page xxiii - Hence it may safely be considered, not only as the primeval source from which all subsequent historians of English affairs have principally derived their materials, and consequently the criterion by which they are to be judged, but also as the faithful depository of our national idiom ; affording, at the same time, to the scientific investigator of the human mind a very interesting and extraordinary example of the changes incident to a language, as well as to a nation, in its progress from rudeness...
Page 171 - Contrary in any wise notwithstanding although express mention of the true yearly value or certainty of the premises or any of them or of any other gifts or grants by Us or by any of Our progenitors or predecessors heretofore made to the said...
Page 167 - And, of our more special grace, certain knowledge and mere motion, we have given and granted, and by these presents, for us, our heirs and successors, do give and grant, unto the said...

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