The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, D.D., Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols, R. Baldwin, Otridge and Son, J. Sewell, F. and C. Rivington, T. Payne, R. Faulder, G. and J. Robinson, R. Lea, J. Nunn, W. Cuthell, T. Egerton, ... [and 12 others], 1801
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Page 38 - I have ever hated all nations, professions, and communities, and all my love is toward individuals: for instance I hate the tribe of lawyers, but I love Counsellor Such-a-one, and Judge Such-a-one: it is so with physicians, (I will not speak of my own trade,) soldiers, English, Scotch, French, and the rest. But principally I hate and detest that animal called man; although I heartily love John, Peter, Thomas, and so forth.
Page 110 - I of the religion of Erasmus, a Catholic ; so I live, so I shall die ; and hope one day to meet you, Bishop Atterbury, the younger Craggs, Dr.- Garth, Dean Berkley, and Mr.
Page 37 - I like the scheme of our meeting after distresses and dispersions ; but the chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it ; and if I could compass that design without hurting my own person or fortune, I would be the most indefatigable writer you have ever seen, without reading.
Page 196 - The Whigs were ravished to see me, and would lay hold on me as a twig while they are drowning...
Page 97 - As to this country,* there have been three terrible years dearth of corn, and every place strewed with beggars ; but dearths are common in better climates, and our evils here lie much deeper. Imagine a nation the two thirds of...
Page 228 - There is a young fellow here in town we are all fond of, and about a year or two come from the university, one Harrison, a pretty little fellow, with a great deal of wit, good sense, and good nature...
Page 34 - ... above three or four contemporaries, and, if they could be united, would drive the world before them. I think it was so among the poets in the time of Augustus; but envy, and party, and pride, have hindered it among us.
Page 80 - I now hold the pen for my Lord Bolingbroke, who is reading your letter between two haycocks; but his attention is somewhat diverted, by casting his eyes on the clouds, not in admiration of what you say, but for fear of a shower.
Page 33 - Your happiness is greater than your merit, in choosing your favourites so indifferently among either party; this you owe partly to your education, and partly to your genius employing you in an art in which faction has nothing to do, for I suppose Virgil and Horace are equally read by Whigs and Tories. You have no more to do with the constitution of church and state, than a Christian at Constantinople...
Page 72 - I am in my own farm," says he, "and here I shoot strong and tenacious roots: I have caught hold of the earth, to use a gardener's phrase, and neither my enemies nor my friends will find it an easy matter to transplant me again.

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