The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: Or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (Google eBook)

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John Murray, 1882 - Evolution - 458 pages
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Just thick prose, and nothing all that interesting yet. - Goodreads
This was hard to read. - Goodreads
And his writing style is not concise or easy to follow. - Goodreads
Beautiful insight, and many illustrative examples. - Goodreads
Very difficult to read, however interesting. - Goodreads
He then moves on to explain natural selection. - Goodreads

Review: The Origin of Species

User Review  - Walker Starr - Goodreads

Good stuff, but holy crap, this book is why cliff notes were invented. Sooo tedious with the run-on writing style. How many qualifying remarks does a single sentence need?!? But seriously, a good book. Read full review

Review: The Origin of Species

User Review  - Mark - Goodreads

Critical observation plus intuitive generalization of data makes Darwin's ingenuity so remarkably insightful. Read full review

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Page 64 - It may be said that natural selection is daily and hourly scrutinising, throughout the world, every variation, even the slightest; rejecting that which is bad, preserving and adding up all that is good; silently and insensibly working, whenever and wherever opportunity offers, at the improvement of each organic being in relation to its organic and inorganic conditions of life.
Page 48 - In these several senses, which pass into each other, I use for convenience' sake the general term of Struggle for Existence.
Page 63 - Nature's productions should be far 'truer' in character than man's productions; that they should be infinitely better adapted to the most complex conditions of life, and should plainly bear the stamp of far higher workmanship?
Page 61 - If such do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than can possibly survive) that individuals having any advantage, however slight, over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed.
Page 162 - If it could be proved that any part of the structure of any one species had been formed for the exclusive good of another species, it would annihilate my theory, for such could not have been produced through natural selection.
Page 48 - It is the doctrine of Malthus applied with manifold force to the whole animal and vegetable kingdoms ; for in this case there can be no artificial increase of food, and no prudential restraint from marriage.
Page 382 - What can be more curious than that the hand of a man, formed for grasping, that of a mole for digging, the leg of the horse, the paddle of the porpoise, and the wing of the bat, should all be constructed on the same pattern, and should include similar bones, in the same relative positions?
Page 146 - If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.
Page 61 - Several writers have misapprehended or objected to the term Natural Selection, Some have even imagined that natural selection induces variability, whereas it' implies only the. preservation of such variations as arise and are beneficial to the being under its conditions of * life.
Page xvii - In the distant future I see open fields for far more important researches. Psychology will be based on a new foundation, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation. Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.

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