The Birchbark House

Front Cover
Disney-Hyperion, Jul 21, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 256 pages
237 Reviews
For as long as Omakayas can remember, she and her family have lived on the land her people call the Island of the Golden-Breasted Woodpecker. Although the chimookoman, white people, encroach more and more on their land, life continues much as it always has. Every summer the family builds a new birchbark house; every fall they go to ricing camp to harvest and feast; they move to the cedar log house before the first snows arrive, and celebrate the end of the long, cold winters at maple-sugaring camp. In between, Omakayas fights with her annoying little brother Pinch, plays with the adorable baby, Neewo, and tries to be grown-up like her beautiful older sister, Angeline. But the satisfying rhythms of their lives are shattered when a visitor comes to their lodge one winter night, bringing with him an invisible enemy that will change things forever.

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lovely illustrations. - Goodreads
The smallpox was so hard to read about. - Goodreads
Educational and entertaining, well written, compelling. - Goodreads
Liked how they had pictures in the book to break it up. - Goodreads
She also has a talent for writing emotions. - Goodreads
The illustrations were the weakest link, I thought. - Goodreads

Review: The Birchbark House (The Birchbark House)

User Review  - Cathy Jaskiewicz - Goodreads

A youth fiction book I read for my 5th grade class, this was billed as a Native American answer to "Little House in the Big Woods". It's set on an island in Lake Superior, off the Upper Peninsula ... Read full review

Review: The Birchbark House (The Birchbark House)

User Review  - Amanda - Goodreads

Such a lovely story. I know if I had read this book as a child it would have been among my favorites. Even as an adult, the story spoke to me, gripped me, even made me tear-up. The cultural and ... Read full review

Contents

The Girl from Spirit Island i
1
NEEBIN Summer i The Birchbark House
5
Old Tallow
19
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (1999)

Karen Louise Erdrich was born on June 7, 1954 in Little Falls, Minnesota. Erdrich grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota, where both of her parents were employed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Erdrich graduated from Dartmouth College in 1976 with an AB degree, and she received a Master of Arts in creative writing from Johns Hopkins University in 1979. Erdrich published a number of poems and short stories from 1978 to 1982. In 1981 she married author and anthropologist Michael Dorris, and together they published The World's Greatest Fisherman, which won the Nelson Algren Award in 1982. In 1984 she won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Love Medicine, which is an expansion of a story that she had co-written with Dorris. Love Medicine was also awarded the Virginia McCormick Scully Prize (1984), the Sue Kaufman Prize (1985) and the Los Angeles Times Award for best novel (1985). In addition to her prose, Erdrich has written several volumes of poetry, a textbook, children's books, and short stories and essays for popular magazines. She has been the recipient of numerous awards for professional excellence, including the National Magazine Fiction Award in 1983 and a first-prize O. Henry Award in 1987. Erdrich has also received the Pushcart Prize in Poetry, the Western Literacy Association Award, the 1999 World Fantasy Award, and the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction in 2006. In 2007 she refused to accept an honorary doctorate from the University of North Dakota in protest of its use of the "Fighting Sioux" name and logo. Erdrich's novel The Round House made the New York Times bestseller list in 2013.

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