The works of Alexander Pope. Containing the principal notes of drs. Warburton and Warton [&c.]. To which are added, some original letters, with additional observations, and memoirs, by W.L. Bowles (Google eBook)

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Page 343 - His gardens next your admiration call; On every side you look, behold the wall! No pleasing intricacies intervene, No artful wildness to perplex the scene ; Grove nods at grove, each alley has a brother, And half the platform just reflects the other.
Page 65 - Created half to rise, and half to fall: Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all; Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurl'd; The glory jest, and riddle of the world!
Page 48 - Planets and suns run lawless through the sky ; Let ruling angels from their spheres be hurl'd, Being on being wreck'd, and world on world ; Heaven's whole foundations to their centre nod, And Nature trembles to the throne- of God. All this dread order break — for whom ? for thee ? Vile worm ! —oh madness ! pride ! impiety ! IX.
Page 56 - All discord, harmony not understood ; All partial evil, universal good : And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, WHATEVER is, is RIGHT.
Page 50 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent ; Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect in a hair as heart ; As full, as perfect in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns. To Him no high, no low, no great, no small ; He fills, He bounds, connects and equals all.
Page 115 - Nor think, in Nature's state they blindly trod; The state of Nature was the reign of God: Self-love and social at her birth began, Union the bond of all things, and of man.
Page 87 - Fools ! who from hence into the notion fall, That vice or virtue there is none at all. If white and black blend, soften, and unite A thousand ways, is there no black or white ? Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain ; 'Tis to mistake them, costs the time and pain.
Page 119 - Go, from the creatures thy instructions take: Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield ; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field; Thy arts of building from the bee receive ; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Page 152 - But mutual wants this happiness increase, All nature's difference keeps all nature's peace. Condition, circumstance, is not the thing, Bliss is the same in subject or in king; In who obtain defence, or who defend, In him who is, or him who finds a friend : Heaven breathes through every member of the whole One common blessing as one common soul.
Page 21 - When the proud steed shall know why man restrains His fiery course, or drives him o'er the plains; When the dull ox, why now he breaks the clod, Is now a victim, and now Egypt's god: Then shall man's pride and dulness comprehend His actions', passions', being's use and end; Why doing, sufFring, check'd, impell'd; and why This hour a slave, the next a deity.

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