Commentary on Aristotle's Physics

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A&C Black, Jun 1, 2003 - 670 pages
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Contents

THE PRINCIPLES OF NATURAL THINGS
1
The later philosophers also were involved in this same error
17
The opinions of the Physicists who spoke of the principles
31
There are three principles of natural things no more no less
47
The problems and the errors of the ancients which spring from
63
Matter is distinguished from privation Matter is neither
68
THE PRINCIPLES OF NATURAL SCIENCE
74
How physics and mathematics differ in their consideration
83
The definition of time is given and explained
278
Certain things which are usually said about time are clarified
288
He compares time to things which are in the now
297
Difficulties concerning the existence and unity of time
304
THE DIVISION OF MOTION INTO ITS SPECIES
311
The species of mutation are established It is shown which
317
He concludes that there is motion only in quantity quality
332
The generic specific and numerical unity of motion
341

Physics determines what the causes are and how many species
93
Concerning the different modes of causing and those things
99
After making certain divisions among effects and causes
107
The difference between chance and fortune The causes
114
Natural philosophy demonstrates from all of the four genera
120
It is demonstrated that nature acts for an end
128
How necessity is found in natural things
135
The definition of motion
145
Motion is the act of the mobile object as the subject in which
152
Physics considers the infinite The opinions of the ancients
163
He proves without suppositions that there is no actually infinite
179
The meanings of things which are said about the infinite
195
He argues whether place is form or matter
210
The definition of place
224
From the given definition of place the difficulties raised
237
It is shown from motion that there is no separated void
250
It is shown from the void itself that there is no separated void
262
It is argued whether time exists and whether the same now
272
The contrariety of motions
351
Certain difficulties are answered
361
The divisibility of time follows from the divisibility
376
Two ways in which motion is divided
397
Before every being moved there is a has been moved
411
The division of rest and of coming to rest
426
That which is without quantitative parts can be moved only
440
In local motion the mover and the moved must be together
457
There is no alteration in the first species of quality in regard
472
From the principles established in the preceding lecture
486
THE FIRST MOTION AND THE FIRST MOVER
499
Arguments against Anaxagoras and Empedocles who held that
517
It cannot be said that some things are always at rest and all other
532
It is impossible for a thing to be moved by another to infinity
547
How the parts of a selfmover are related to each other
562
Local motion is the first motion
577
From the foregoing certain difficulties are answered
592
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