Projecting Illusion: Film Spectatorship and the Impression of Reality

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Cambridge University Press, May 28, 1997 - Performing Arts - 176 pages
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Projecting Illusion offers a systematic analysis of the impression of reality in the cinema and the pleasure it provides the film spectator. Film affords an especially compelling aesthetic experience that can be considered as a form of illusion akin to the experience of daydream and dream. Examining the concept of illusion and its relationship to fantasy in the experience of visual representation, Richard Allen situates his explanation within the context of an analytical criticism of contemporary film theory.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Althusser Lacan and Film Theory
7
Althussers Theory of Ideology
9
The Theory of the Cinematic Apparatus
19
The Lacanian Subject
25
The Theory of Cinematic Suture
34
Marxist Literary Modernism and Cinematic Enunciation
39
The Lure of Metaphysics
47
Reproductive Illusion in the Cinema
90
Sensory Illusion and Seeing Aspects
97
Projective Illusion and the Cinematic Image
106
Projective Illusion and Cinematic Narration
114
Cinema Psychoanalysis and the Film Spectator
120
Dream Fantasy and Projective Illusion
122
Identification Voyeurism and Projective Illusion
127
Varieties of Disavowal
135

Husserls Transcendental Phenomenology
50
Derridas Deconstruction of Transcendental Phenomenology
55
Wittgensteins Private Language Argument
63
The Subject of Theory
71
Representation Illusion and the Cinema
81
Representation and Illusion
82
Voyeurism Fetishism and Sexual Difference
143
Notes
155
Filmography
169
Index
171
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About the author (1997)

Allen is Principal Lecturer in English at Anglia Polytechnic University in Cambridge.

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