Pelagonius and Latin Veterinary Terminology in the Roman Empire

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BRILL, 1995 - Medical - 695 pages
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The language of Latin veterinary medicine has never been systematically studied. This book seeks to elucidate the pathological and anatomical terminology of Latin veterinary treatises, and the general linguistic features of Pelagonius as a technical writer.
Veterinary practice in antiquity cannot be related directly to that of the modern world. In antiquity a man could claim expertise in horse medicine without ever passing an examination. Owners often treated their own animals. The distinction between 'professional' and layman was thus blurred, and equally the distinction between 'scientific' terminology and layman's terminology was not as clear-cut as it is today.
The first part of the book is devoted to some of the non-linguistic factors which influenced the terminology in which horse diseases and their treatment were described.
  

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Contents

nonspecialist treatment of animals
66
addressees readership
103
Pelagonian and nonPelagonian elements in
149
Pelagonius and Apsyrtus
209
Some names of diseases
239
Anatomical terms
361
The language of Pelagonius
430
Morphology and word formation
496
Vocabulary
569
General conclusions
642
Pelagonius ueterinarii and technical
662
Bibliography
672
Index
685
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

J.N. Adams, Ph.D. (1970), Oxford, F.B.A. (1992), is Professor of Latin in the University of Manchester. He has published extensively on Latin linguistics, particularly on sub- and non-literary varieties of the language.

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