Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice: The Polluter-Industrial Complex in the Age of Globalization (Google eBook)

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Jul 17, 2008 - Nature - 272 pages
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Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice provides a comprehensive overview of the achievements and challenges confronting the environmental justice movement. Pressured by increased international competition and the demand for higher profits, industrial and political leaders are working to weaken many of America's most essential environmental, occupational, and consumer protection laws. In addition, corporate-led globalization exports many ecological hazards abroad. The result is a deepening of the ecological crisis in both the United States and the Global South. However, not all people are impacted equally. In this process of capital restructuring, it is the most marginalized segments of society -poor people of color and the working class-that suffer the greatest force of corporate environmental abuses. Daniel Faber, a leading environmental sociologist, analyzes the global political and economic forces that create these environmental injustices. With a multi-disciplinary approach, Faber presents both broad overviews and powerful insider case studies, examining the connections between many different struggles for change. Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice explores compelling movements to challenge the polluter-industrial complex and bring about meaningful social transformation.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1
15
Chapter 2
67
Chapter 3
119
Chapter 4
171
Chapter 5
221
Conclusion
259
Bibliography
275
Index
291
About the Author
303
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Daniel Faber is director of the Northeastern Environmental Justice Research Collaborative in Boston. He co-founded the international journal Capitalism, Nature, Socialism and is the author or editor of several books, including Foundations for Social Change.

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